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  • 19
    May

    Fundamentals in Data Science - BD2K Guide Summary & NIH Context (Phil Bourne, National Institutes of Health)

    May 19, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 12
    May

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Considerations & Limitations for Clinical Data (Zak Kohane, Harvard University)

    May 12, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 5
    May

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Reproducibility (John Ionnaidis, Standford University)

    May 5, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 28
    Apr

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Ethical Issues (Bartha Knoppers, McGill University)

    April 28, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 21
    Apr

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Data Sharing & Social Obstacles (Christine Borgman & Irene Pasquetto, UCLA)

    April 21, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 14
    Apr

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Open Science (Brian Nosek, University of Virginia)

    April 14, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 7
    Apr

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Modeling Synthesis (John Harer, Duke University)

    April 7, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 31
    Mar

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Data Visualization Tools & Communication (Nils Gehlenborg, Harvard University)

    March 31, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 24
    Mar

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Causal Inference (Joe Hogan, Brown University)

    March 24, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 17
    Mar

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Data Issues: Multiple Testing, Bias, Confounding & Missing Data (Lance Waller, Emory University)

    March 17, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 14
    Mar

    Pi Day @ NIH

    March 14, 2017

    Important Notice: Pi Day Postponement

    Due to the likelihood of a significant snowstorm on March 14, we are canceling all Pi Day events. However, we will reschedule for a later date, so keep an eye out for updates!

    The National Institutes of Health will hold a Pi Day Celebration, March 14, 2017, 11:00am - 4:30pm ET, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Bldg35A, on the NIH main campus in Bethesda, MD. The goal of the NIH Pi Day Celebration is to increase awareness across the biomedical science community of the role that the quantitative sciences play in biomedical science.

    Event URL: https://nihpiday.nih.gov/

    Videocast: https://videocast.nih.gov/

  • 10
    Mar

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Bayesian Inference (Mike Newton, California State University, Sacramento)

    March 10, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 3
    Mar

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Algorithms & Optimization (Pavel Pevzner, University of California, San Diego)

    March 3, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 24
    Feb

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Unsupervised Machine Learning (Ali Shojaie, University of Washington)

    February 24, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 17
    Feb

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Supervised Machine Learning (Daniela Witten, University of Washington)

    February 17, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 10
    Feb

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Data Modeling & Inference Overview (Rafa Irizarry, Harvard University)

    February 10, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 3
    Feb

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Commons: Lessons Learned, Current State (Vivien Bonazzi, National Institutes of Health)

    February 3, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 27
    Jan

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Modern Computing: Cloud, Distributed & High Performance (Umit Catalyurek, Georgia Institute of Technology)

    January 27, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 20
    Jan

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Running a Data Science Laboratory: Adventures of a Network Biologist (Trey Ideker, University of California, San Diego)

    January 20, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 17
    Jan

    Big Data processing & Medicine - A Use Case Presentation

    January 17, 2017

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science, which coordinates the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) program, announces Big Data Processing & Medicine – a Data Science and Computer Science view of use cases.

    Title: Big Data processing & Medicine – A Use Case Presentation

    Date: January 17, 2017, 10:00-12:00pm

    Location: Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Building 35A, Room 610 (Rear Room Only)

    Videocast: Click Here

    Registration: No registration is required

    Audience: This is intended for a general scientific audience with an interest in modern computing.  No programming is required.

    Abstract: Big Data processing with Hadoop is revolutionizing medicine. Enabling Genomic Analysis on much larger scale, providing the backbone for precision medicine by unifying research & clinical silos, and enabling bedside data to be kept for retrospective analysis. This talk will cover real uses cases in Genomics and Medicine for big data and Hadoop. It will also touch on the technology used to accomplish the results.

    Additional Details

    This presentation focuses on biomedical challenges such as:

    • Predicting clinical events in order to:
    1. Reduce hospital readmissions. Hospital systems want to understand the spending and causes on hospital readmissions and reduce those readmissions. They also want to predict the probability of a discharged patient being re-admitted for the same or a similar condition.
    2. Reduce preventable death from issues such as sepsis that require real time inputs as well as retrospective data through scalable machine learning.
    • Gaining clinical insight on acute patients from data generated from multiple streaming sensors.
    • Getting meaningful clinical value from genomic data (Whole Genome or Gene-Wide Association Studies) and speeding up analyses.

    More Data Science Opportunities:

    Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Tonya Scott, 301-402-9817, and/or the federal TTY relay number (1-800-877-8339).   

  • 13
    Jan

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Data Workflows & Pipelines (Rommie Amaro, University of California, San Diego)

    January 13, 2017

    The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, is a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 9
    Jan

    BD2K Multi-Council Working Group Meeting

    January 9, 2017

    This meeting has been canceled.

    The BD2K Multi-Council Working Group is comprised of a member from each NIH Institute and Center Council. This body provides trans-NIH programmatic input and review for BD2K programs and Data Science activities at NIH. The Multi-Council Working Group meets three times per year to discuss, and review in detail, BD2K-proposed funding plans. Each meeting is comprised of an Open Session (11:00am - 12:00pm ET), which is open to the public to listen, and a Closed Session (12:30pm - 3:00pm), which is open to Multi-Council membership and BD2K program staff only.  For additional information, visit the BD2K Multi-Council Working Group website.

  • 6
    Jan

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Computing Overview (Patricia Kovatch, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)

    January 6, 2017

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 16
    Dec

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Natural Language Processing (Noemie Elhadad, Columbia)

    December 16, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 9
    Dec

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Exploratory Data Analysis (Brian Caffo, Johns Hopkins)

    December 9, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 2
    Dec

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Data Wrangling, Normalization, Preprocessing (Joseph Picone, Temple)

    December 2, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 1
    Dec

    Open Data Science Symposium: How Open Data and Open Science are Transforming Biomedical Research

    December 1, 2016

    Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center

    5701 Marinelli Rd, North Bethesda, MD 20852

    Metro accessible, walking distance to White Flint station on the Red Line.

    The Open Data Science Symposium 2016 will be held in conjuction with the BD2K All Hands Meeting 2016, November 29-30, 2016.

    Webcast will be available for this event.

    Open Data Science Symposium 2016 Agenda

    Registration

    Registration deadline is November 18, 2016.

    Admission to this event is free and open to the public.

    Registration is required for on-site and webinar attendance.

    To register, visit the Open Data Science Symposium 2016 Website.

    Event Summary

    Funding agencies and biomedical research organizations are increasingly embracing Open Science research paradigms characterized by new models of collaboration, new modes of data sharing, and new requirements for making data publicly available. The growing availability of open biomedical data and cloud-based infrastructure is creating unprecedented opportunities for using biomedical Big Data in novel ways to help solve pressing public health and biomedical research challenges. This Symposium features the Six Team Finalists of the Open Science Prize, an international prize competition led by the NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative, in partnership with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the UK-based Wellcome Trust, to support the development of innovative tools, products, and services that utilize Open Data. The Symposium will also include panel discussions to explore trends in Open Science and Open Data as well as emerging models for supporting Open Science across the globe.  

    Event Contact

    Individuals with disabilities who need Sign Language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact the event organizers at least 7 days prior to the event.  

    For meeting logistics questions, contact:

    Abbe Smith, Registrar
    Capital Consulting Corporation
    asmith@capconcorp.com
    301-468-6084

    For program questions, contact: BD2K_events@od.nih.gov

  • 29
    Nov

    BD2K All Hands Meeting 2016

    November 29, 2016

    Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center

    5701 Marinelli Rd, North Bethesda, MD 20852

    (Metro accessible, walking distance to White Flint station on the Red Line)

    Webcast will be available for this event.

    BD2K All Hands Meeting 2016 Agenda

    Registration

    Registration deadline is November 18, 2016.

    To register, visit the BD2K All Hands Meeting 2016 Website

    Due to space limitations, attendance at the BD2K All Hands Meeting 2016 is open to the BD2K grantee community and NIH program staff.

    Interested Federal employees may contact BD2K_events@od.nih.gov to register, if space allows.

    The Open Data Science Symposium 2016 on December 1, 2016, which will be held in conjunction with the BD2K All Hands Meeting 2016, is open to the public. 

    Event Summary

    The 2016 BD2K All Hands Meeting will bring together researchers, educators, developers, and trainees funded by the BD2K Initiative. The goals of the All Hands Meeting are to showcase the work being done by BD2K-sponsored programs and to build a cohesive BD2K consortium that maximizes synergies between participants.

    For a look at what happened at last year's meeting, visit the BD2K All Hands Meeting 2015 Website

    Submit an Abstract

    Abstracts will be selected for short talks, posters, and demos.

    Abstract Submission Guidelines

    Abstract submission deadline is October 27, 2016.

    Event Contact

    Individuals with disabilities who need Sign Language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this meeting must contact the event coordinators at least 7 days prior to the event.

    For meeting logistics questions, contact:

    Abbe Smith, Registrar
    Capital Consulting Corporation
    asmith@capconcorp.com
    301-468-6084

    For program questions, contact: BD2K_events@od.nih.gov

  • 24
    Nov

    Thanksgiving - National Holiday

    November 24, 2016

    On Thursday, November 24, 2016, the Federal Government will be closed in observance of the Thanksgiving Day national holiday.

  • 18
    Nov

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Social Networking Data (Joseph Picone, Temple)

    November 18, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 15
    Nov

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture - Peter Murray-Rust, ContentMine

    November 15, 2016

    The NIH Frontiers in Data Science Lecture Series presents "ContentMine: High-Throughput Extraction of Facts from Scientific Articles" by Dr. Peter Murray-Rust, University of Cambridge, and Founder of ContentMine, 1:00pm - 2:00pm ET, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Bldg 35A, Rm 610, on the NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD. This event will be videocast and archived for public viewing here.

    For abstract and bio information, visit the Frontiers in Data Science Webpage.

    REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION: Individuals with disabilities who need Sign Language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Tonya Scott (Tonya.Scott@nih.gov or 301-402-9817) and/or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339) at least 5 business days prior to the event.

  • 11
    Nov

    Veteran's Day - National Holiday

    November 11, 2016

    On Friday, November 11, 2016, the Federal Government will be closed in observance of the Veteran's Day national holiday.

  • 4
    Nov

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Databases & Data Warehouses, Data: Structures, Types, Integrations (Chaitan Baru, NSF)

    November 4, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 28
    Oct

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Data Representation Overview (Anita Bandrowski, UCSD)

    October 28, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 21
    Oct

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Metadata Standards (Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Oxford)

    October 21, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 14
    Oct

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Provenance (Zachary Ives, Penn)

    October 14, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 10
    Oct

    Columbus Day - National Holiday

    October 10, 2016

    On Monday, October 10, 2016, the Federal Government will be closed in observance of the Columbus Day national holiday.

  • 7
    Oct

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Ontologies (Michel Dumontier, Stanford)

    October 7, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 30
    Sep

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Data Curation and Version Control (Pascale Gaudet, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics)

    September 30, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 30
    Sep

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture & NIH Challenge Symposium 2016

    September 30, 2016

    Time: 1:30pm - 4:00pm

    Where: Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Bldg 35A, Rm 610, on the NIH Main Campus in Bethesda, MD.

    Videocast: https://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=19856&bhcp=1

    The NIH Challenge Symposium 2016 will explore the use of challenges as a mechanism for achieving scientific goals. The Symposium will start with remarks from Tom Kalil, Deputy Director for Policy at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, 1:35pm-2:00pm ET. Next, Dr. Karim R. Lakhani, a Harvard Business School professor who does research on challenges and innovation, will give a lecture, 2:00pm-3:00pm ET. The Symposium will conclude with a panel discussion with Lora Kutkat (NIH), Sandeep Patel (HHS), and Chris Nelson (OSTP), 3:00pm - 4:00pm ET.

    Guest Lecturer: Karim R. Lakhani, Ph.D., Harvard Business School

    Title: Should We Go to the Crowd First? Lessons from Running Crowd Contests in Life Sciences: How and Why Crowd Contests for Algorithm Development Work

    Time: 2:00pm - 3:00pm ET

    Abstract: Over the last decade, crowd-based models of innovaton have been shown to be highly complementary to a range of academic and industrial algorithmic and scientific problems. The work of the Crowd Innovation Lab and NASA Tournament Lab at Harvard University have shown that crowd-driven solutions for algorithmic challenges in computational biology, image analysis, and space sciences routinely outperform internally developed solutions from elite organizations. This mini workshop will review the results, provide a systematic framework for understanding the place of crowd contests within academic life science research programs, and provide a deep dive into two recent challenges in genomics and imaging.

    Bio: Karim R. Lakhani is an Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School, the Principal Investigator of the Crowd Innovation Lab and NASA Tournament Lab at the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science, and the faculty co-founder of the Harvard Business School Digital Initiative. He specializes in technology management and innovation. His research examines crowd-based innovation models and the digital transformation of companies and industries. Professor Lakhani is known for his pioneering scholarship on how communities and contests can be designed and managed to achieve innovative outcomes. He has partnered with NASA, TopCoder, and the Harvard Medical School to conduct field experiments on the design of crowd innovation programs. His research on digital transformation has shown the importance of data and analytics as drivers of business and operating model transformation and source of competitive advantage

    Individuals with disabilities who need sign language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Sonynka.Ngosso@nih.gov at 301-402-9827 at least 5 business days in advance of the event.

     

  • 23
    Sep

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Finding and Accessing Datasets, Indexing, and Identifiers (Lucila Ohno-Machado, UCSD)

    September 23, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 23
    Sep

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture - Dario Taraborelli, Wikimedia Foundation

    September 23, 2016

    Guest Lecturer: Dario Taraborelli, Ph.D., Head of Research, Wikimedia Foundation

    Title: Wikidata: Verifiable, Linked Open Knowledge that Anyone Can Edit 

    Time: 9:00am - 10:00am ET

    Where: Natcher Conference Center, Bldg 45, Balcony A, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    Videocast:  videocast.nih.gov/​

    Abstract: As the largest and most popular general reference work on the Internet, Wikipedia is one of the primary entry points to scholarly literature and a primary channel for the dissemination of scientific content. Scholarly communities may be less familiar with the role Wikipedia plays as a source of linked open data for a large number of applications and services. In this talk, Dr. Taraborelli will give an overview of Wikidata, the collaborative knowledge base that anyone can edit, and Wikipedia’s fastest growing sister project. He will focus specifically on Wikidata initiatives of relevance to the scientific community as well as recent efforts to build an open bibliographic and citation repository in Wikidata to help volunteer contributors build the sum of human knowledge. Preserving the provenance and verifiability of information in Wikipedia is critical to the viability of the project. He will showcase several ways in which human, machine, and expert curation can help achieve this goal and how scholarly communities can leverage this knowledge corpus via open APIs.

    Bio: Dario Taraborelli is a social computing researcher and open knowledge advocate based in San Francisco. He is currently Head of Research at the Wikimedia Foundation, the non-profit organization that operates Wikipedia and its sister projects. His research spans the behavioral and social aspects of online collaboration and commons-based peer production. As a co-author of the Altmetrics Manifesto and a long-standing open access advocate, he is interested in the design of open systems to promote, track, and measure the impact, reuse, and discoverability of research objects.

    Event Contact: Individuals with disabilities who need sign language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Sonynka.Ngosso@nih.gov at 301-402-9816 at least 5 business days in advance of the event.

  • 16
    Sep

    Fundamentals in Data Science - Data Management Overview (Bill Hersh, Oregon Health Sciences)

    September 16, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 16
    Sep

    Computational Biology: Past, Present, and Future PLOS Symposium

    September 16, 2016

    Time: 9:30am - 4:00pm ET

    Place: Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Bldg 35A, Rm 620, on the NIH Bethesda, MD campus.

    For those unable to attend in person, the event will be webcast here: https://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=19639&bhcp=1

    Register: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/WS5Y3BP

    The Symposium is open to all NIH/HHS staff and the public.

    Agenda: http://blogs.plos.org/biologue/files/2016/08/CB_Symposium-Agenda_5-1_for-online.pdf

    The Symposium will be chaired by PLOS Editors-in-Chief Ruth Nussinov and Jason Papin and the Journal’s Founding Editor-in-Chief, Dr.  Phil Bourne, Associate Director for Data Science, NIH. Keynote addresses will include: David J. Lipman, NCBI; Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; and Bert Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The agenda also includes two discussion panels served by PLOS Computational Biology editors from a range of fields. The morning panel will discuss the “Biggest Challenges and Greatest Opportunities in Computational Biology over the Next 10 Years”. The afternoon panel will discuss “How Computational Biology Will Affect Human Health." Closing remarks will be given by Dr. Michael Gottesman, Deputy Director of Intramural Research, NIH. Please share this invitation with your scientific communities. For additional information, contact: ploscompbiol@plos.org.

    Read the blog post about the Symposium in PLOS BiologueExit Link Disclaimer.

  • 9
    Sep

    Fundamentals of Data Science - Introduction to Big Data & the Data Lifecycle (Mark Musen, Stanford)

    September 9, 2016

    Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) is pleased to announce The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science, a series of online lectures given by experts from across the country covering a range of diverse topics in data science. This course is an introductory overview that assumes no prior knowledge or understanding of data science. This lecture series is a joint effort between the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (BD2K TCC), the BD2K Centers Coordination Center (BD2K CCC), and the NIH Office of the Associate Director of Data Science. For the most up-to-date information about the series and to view archived presentations, go to: http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars.

    The series will run every Friday from 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET | 9:00am - 10:00am PT.

    All sessions will be streamed live and archived for on demand public viewing.

    Please join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/341938597813942273

    If you prefer to use your phone, you can also dial in using the following information:
    United States: +1 (914) 614-3221
    Access Code: 736-335-403

    View all archived videos on the BD2K TCC YouTube channel: 
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKIDQOa0JcUd3K9C1TS7FLQ

    For additional event information, contact Crystal Stewart.

  • 8
    Sep

    Webinar - Overview of Deep Learning in Healthcare

    September 8, 2016

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science (ADDS) announces training opportunities in Deep Learning, a statistical/machine learning classification technique.  Although computationally demanding, recently it has been used successfully to model complex nonlinear functions such as images. The first part of this two-part series will be held on September 8th.  It will be an hour-long overview followed by a half hour for questions.  The second part will be a day-long, in-depth workshop held on September 22.  Attending or watching the overview first is highly recommended.  Registration is required for the September 22nd workshop, but not for the September 8th lecture.

    Title: Overview of Deep Learning in Healthcare

    Date: September 8, 3:00pm - 4:30pm ET

    Location: Building 31, 6C Room 7, NIH Bethesda campus.

    Videocast: https://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?Live=19717&bhcp=1

    Open to all; no registration required.

    Abstract: Machine Learning (ML) has become a core technology underlying many modern applications, especially in healthcare. Machine learning techniques provide powerful methods for analyzing large data sets, such as medical images, electronic health records, and genomics.  Recent advances in Deep Learning (DL) provide an analysis framework that can be used to automatically classify images and objects with  (and occasionally exceeding) human-level accuracy.  A key advantage of Deep Learning is its ability to perform unsupervised feature extraction over massive data sets making big data part of the solution -- not the problem.  Deep Learning is rapidly becoming a key tool at many of the top technology companies around the world.

    This talk will introduce DL in the broader context of machine learning and discuss critical factors driving the success of DL with examples of how deep learning is advancing healthcare.  We will also outline development and deployment workflows for building powerful DL solutions and provide an overview of relevant open source tool kits, companies, and products.  We will wrap up with a short demo of NVIDIA’s DIGITS training system for rapidly prototyping your own deep learning applications.

    For additional information, please contact Sonynka Ngosso, 301-402-9816.

  • 5
    Sep

    Labor Day - National Holiday

    September 5, 2016

    On Monday, September 5, 2016, the Federal Government will be closed in observance of the Labor Day national holiday.

  • 4
    Jul

    Independence Day - National Holiday

    July 4, 2016

    On Monday, July 4, 2016, the Federal Government will be closed in observance of the Independence Day national holiday.

  • 23
    Jun

    bioCADDIE Repositories Workshop - Data Indexing for DataMed

    June 23, 2016

    The bioCADDIE Project held a Repositories Workshop “Data Indexing for DataMed” at the Estancia in La Jolla, CA on June 23, 2016.  At this workshop, presenters explained the DataMed metadata model, named DatA Tag Suite (DATS), which also has a schema.org-annotated serialization. Participants were given hands-on experience with mapping their repository metadata into the DATS model for indexing.  Watch the YouTube video.

     

    For additional information visit: https://biocaddie.org/biocaddie-repository-workshop-june-23-2016Exit Link Disclaimer or email: biocaddie@ucsd.edu.

  • 8
    Jun

    Workshop - Refining the Concept of Scientific Inference When Working with Big Data

    June 8, 2016

     

    The Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics presents: "Refining the Concept of Scientific Inference When Working with Big Data" - a 2-day workshop on the challenges of applying scientific inference to big data. This workshop is sponsored by the NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative and the National Science Foundation.

    Date:  June 8-9, 2016
    Location:  Keck Center, Room 100
    500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC

    This workshop will be professionally webcast. If you intend to join us in person or online, please register by Monday, June 6th. For more information, please visit the workshop website.

  • 1
    Jun

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture - Po-Shen Loh (expii.com), World-Scale Personalized Learning through Crowdsourcing & Algorithms

    June 1, 2016

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science invites you to attend the following lecture as part of the NIH Frontiers in Data Science Lecture Series: 

    TITLE:  World-Scale Personalized Learning Through Crowdsourcing and Algorithms"

    SPEAKER:  Dr. Po-Shen Loh, Associate Professor of Mathematics, Carnegie Mellon University and Founder of expii.com

    DATE:  Wednesday, June 1, 2016, 3:30pm - 4:30pm EST

    LOCATION:  Lecture will be available via webcast.

    VIDEOCAST LINK:  TBD

    ABSTRACT:  Improving math and science education is a national priority. Personalized education, like personalized medicine, is within reach and has the potential to transform current practices through the usage of data and algorithms. Personalized education can benefit everyone from young students to established scientists. Established scientists can utilize it to fill in knowledge gaps efficiently while young students stay engaged with math and science through active learning. Po-Shen Loh will speak about a pioneering project (expii.com) that will turn every smartphone into a free personalized learning system by combining crowdsourcing and mathematical algorithms. In a modern world where content is everywhere (but of varying quality, and disorganized), the central problem is to identify exactly which piece of content a particular learner should interact with at any given moment based upon the learner’s current knowledge base and long-term goals. Leveraging the Elo rating system from competitive chess, expii introduces a new mathematical framework for answering this question, which casts the central problem into a graph algorithm problem informed by data collected from the universe of users across the platform. This new mathematical formulation also unlocks a paradigm shift away from courses and grades, towards a new ecosystem of atomic concepts and population-wide statistical comparisons. The platform itself is inspired by modern Internet products; it combines elements of Wikipedia and Quora with content creation made as easy as Tumblr and Google Forms, organized like Khan Academy, and with the navigational interface and browsability of Google Maps. It has the potential to organize and widely disseminate the largest body of openly-licensed educational resources ever created and put it into the hands of billions of people worldwide through their smartphones, tablets, and computers.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

    Po-Shen Loh is a math enthusiast and evangelist. He is the national coach of the USA International Mathematical Olympiad team, a math professor at Carnegie Mellon University, and the founder of expii.com, an education technology startup providing a free personalized learning platform on every smartphone. As an academic, Po-Shen has numerous distinctions from an International Mathematical Olympiad silver medal to the National Science Foundation’s CAREER award. His research considers a variety of questions that lie at the intersection of combinatorics (the study of discrete systems), probability theory, and computer science. As an educator, he led Carnegie Mellon University’s Putnam team to multiple 2nd-place finishes among all North American universities. His approach to coaching the National Math Olympiad team received significant press coverage after the USA’s historic victory in 2015. Through expii, Po-Shen extends his activity to the global mainstream by combining algorithms and crowdsourcing to deliver a GPS-style navigational interface for the world of knowledge. Po-Shen received his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Caltech in 2004, graduating first in his class. He received a Master’s degree in Mathematics from the University of Cambridge in 2005, where he was supported by a Winston Churchill Foundation Scholarship. He continued his studies at Princeton, where he completed his Ph.D. in Mathematics at the end of 2009, and has been on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University ever since.

    REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION:

    Individuals with disabilities who need sign language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Kristan Brown at brownks@nih.gov or 301-402-9827 and/or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339) at least 5 business days prior to the event.

  • 30
    May

    Memorial Day - National Holiday

    May 30, 2016

    On Monday, May 30, 2016, the Federal Government will be closed in observance of the Memorial Day national holiday.

  • 20
    May

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture - Terry Richard Stouch, How Far Can We Trust Our Data?

    May 20, 2016

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science invites you to attend the following lecture as part of the NIH Frontiers in Data Science Lecture Series:

    TITLE:  "How Far Can We Trust Our Data?:  The Interpretation, Value, and Use of Drug Discovery Data and the Need for a Bigger Data Approach"

    SPEAKER:  Terry Richard Stouch, Ph.D.

    DATE:  Friday, May 20, 2016, 2:00pm–3:00pm EST

    LOCATION:  Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Building 35A, Room 640, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    This lecture will be videocast here.  

    ABSTRACT:

    How reliable is our drug discovery data? Is it qualitative or quantitative? Is it a hard and fast signpost to direct our efforts or just a hint of what might be? In fact, the percentage of drug discovery data in which we can have high confidence is surprisingly low. And, the common range of "true" error in any measurement is many times larger than the conventional error of measurement. Assays can be difficult in the best of situations and the demand for assays of low cost, speed, high throughput, and utilizing minuscule quantities of compound adds additional compromises. The picture is still more complicated by a myriad of confounding factors that can influence results and may not have consistent influence across assays, compounds, targets, and other factors.

    This presentation will address the author's 3-to-10 and 20% rules that capsulize the true error of drug discovery data, the percentage that can be used with high confidence, and how these rules were determined. Examples of surprising and confounding factors from the experience of many laboratories and companies around the world will be highlighted and lead to a discussion of the need for a "bigger" data of drug discovery that can help improve our understanding and increase the value of our results. The use of stringently-determined predictive models as an adjunct to wet assays for validation and triage will be shown. The importance of data presentation leading to proper interpretation by users will also be discussed.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

    Dr. Terry Richard Stouch has been working in depth with drug discovery data for over 30 years in order to accelerate and increase the success of drug discovery. A user of the data himself, he collaborates closely not only with others who use the data, but more importantly, with those who generate the data. He brings biological, physical chemical, statistical, and computational experience to the evaluation of assays and data. In addition to addressing the raw data, his extensive collaborations have impressed on him the importance of focused data presentation and interpreted metadata to guide interpretation by data-swamped users of data.

    His experience in drug discovery research spans large pharma and biotech. He specializes in drug design, pharmaceutical data analysis, predictive modeling, property prediction, bio-molecular structure, and molecular modeling and simulation. His pharmaceutical research efforts span most therapeutic areas. He has participated in placing eight compounds into clinical trials.

    REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION:

    Individuals with disabilities who need sign language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Kristan Brown, at kristan.brown@nih.gov or 301-402-9827 and/or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339) at least 5 business days prior to the event.

  • 29
    Apr

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture - Anthony Goldbloom (Kaggle), Data Science & Medicine: What's Possibly at the Cutting Edge?

    April 29, 2016

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science invites you to attend the following webinar as part of the NIH Frontiers in Data Science Lecture Series:

    TITLE:  "Data Science and Medicine: What's Possibly at the Cutting Edge?"

    SPEAKER:  Anthony Goldbloom, Co-Founder and CEO of Kaggle

    DATE:  Friday, April 29, 2016, 1:00pm-2:00pm EST

    This webinar has been recorded for the purpose of sharing content for public use. To watch the full YouTube video presentation, please click here.

    ABSTRACT:

    Kaggle hosts data science competitions. Data scientists download data and upload solutions to very difficult problems. Kaggle has collaborated with the NIH to use data science to solve healthcare and medical research problems ranging from using data science to diagnose heart failure from fMRIs (by measuring ejection fraction) to predicting seizures from EEG data. This talk will introduce data science competitions and show some of the surprising things at the cutting edge of medical research.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

    Anthony Goldbloom is a Co-Founder and CEO of Kaggle.  In 2011 and 2012, Forbes Magazine named Anthony as one of the 30 Under 30 in Technology. In 2013, the MIT Tech Review named him one of the Top 35 innovators Under 35. And, the University of Melbourne has awarded him an Alumni of Distinction Award. He holds a first call honors degree in Econometrics from the University of Melbourne.  Anthony has published in the Economist and the Harvard Business Review.

    SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKER:

    Dr. Andrew Arai, Senior Investigator, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) 

    This thought provoking two-part presentation introduces how data science competitions can help to discover solutions to complex biomedical problems. In Part I, Anthony Goldbloom presents an overview of Kaggle’s methodology of designing, conducting, and evaluating data science competitions in medical research. He demonstrates through case studies of recent biomedical research collaborations, including diagnosing and predicting heart failure, seizures, and diabetic retinopathy. In Part II, Dr. Andrew Arai presents the results of a NHLBI collaboration with Kaggle, which conducted a machine learning competition that analyzed MRI imaging data to identify heart damage indicators that can assist with heart attack prediction.

    REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION:

    Individuals with disabilities who need sign language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Kristan Brown at kristan.brown@nih.gov or 301-402-9827, or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339) at least 5 business days prior to the event.

  • 25
    Apr

    BD2K Multi-Council Working Group - May 2016

    April 25, 2016

    Notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Multi-Council Working Group.

    This teleconference meeting will be open to the public as indicated below. Individuals who plan to attend and need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the contact person listed below in advance of the meeting.

    Name of Working Group:  Big Data to Knowledge Multi-Council Working Group

    Date:  April 25, 2016

    Open Session:  11:00am - 12:30pm EST

    Agenda:  Discussion will review current Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) activities and newly proposed BD2K initiatives.

    Open Session Presentations:

    Closed Session: 12:45pm - 3:00pm EST

    Agenda:  Discussion will focus on review of proposed Funding Plans for BD2K Funding Opportunity Announcements.

    Place:  Teleconference
    This meeting is open to the public, but is being held by teleconference only.  No physical meeting location is provided for any interested individuals to listen to committee discussions.

    Join WebEx MeetingExit Link Disclaimer

    Meeting number: 622 421 867

    Meeting password: 1234

    Dial-in: 1-877-668-4493

    This is a listen ONLY meeting. Please submit any questions or comments via email to the contact person listed below.

    Contact Person:  Tonya Scott, email:  tonya.scott@nih.gov, phone:  301-402-9817.

    To view the Federal Register meeting announcement: Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health - Notice of Meeting

     

     

  • 13
    Apr

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture - Ben Shneiderman, Interactive Visual Discovery in Event Analytics

    April 13, 2016

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science invites you to attend the following event as part of the NIH Frontiers in Data Science Lecture Series:

    TITLE:  "Interactive Visual Discovery in Event Analytics: Electronic Health Records and Other Applications"

    SPEAKER:  Ben Shneiderman, Ph.D.

    DATE:  Wednesday, April 13, 2016, 11:00am–12:00pm EST

    LOCATION:  Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Building 35A, Room 610, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    This lecture will be videocast here.

    ABSTRACT: 

    Event Analytics is rapidly emerging as a new topic to extract insights from the growing set of temporal event sequences that come from medical histories, e-commerce patterns, social media log analysis, cybersecurity threats, sensor nets, online education, sports, etc. This talk reviews Dr. Shneiderman's decade of research on visualizing and exploring temporal event sequences to view compact summaries of thousands of patient histories represented as time-stamped events such as strokes, vaccinations, or admissions to an emergency room.  His current work on EventFlow supports point events, such as heart attacks or vaccinations, and interval events, such as medication episodes or long hospitalizations. Demonstrations cover visual interfaces to support hospital quality control analysts who ensure that required procedures were carried out. Dr. Shneiderman will show how domain-specific knowledge and problem-specific insights can lead to sharpening the analytic focus so as to enable more successful pattern and anomaly detection.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER: 

    Ben Shneiderman is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Maryland (UM). He is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, IEEE, and NAI, and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, in recognition of his pioneering contributions to human-computer interaction and information visualization.

    REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION:

    Individuals with disabilities who need sign language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Kristan Brown at kristan.brown@nih.gov or 301-402-9818 and/or the Federal Relay at 1-800-877-8339, at least five business days prior to the event.

  • 5
    Apr

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture - Jon Shon, Translating from Bench to Bedside and Back

    April 5, 2016

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science invites you to attend the following lecture as part of the NIH Frontiers in Data Science Lecture Series:

    TITLE: "Translating from Bench to Bedside and Back – Challenges and Opportunities from a Data Science Perspective"

    SPEAKER: John Shon, Ph.D.

    DATE: Tuesday, April 5, 2016, 1:00pm-2:00pm

    LOCATION: Natcher Conference Center, Building 45, Room F1/F2, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    Lecture will be videocast here.

    ABSTRACT:

    As the cost of sequencing decreases, the generation of sequence data, and more importantly, genetic variation data, increases at a rate that exceeds our ability to fully understand it. The data is also increasingly being generated in clinical contexts, providing the potential to enlighten our mechanistic understanding of disease and therapy. From a data science perspective, Dr. Shon will describe how research and clinical operational  contexts both facilitate and limit the use of next generation sequencing data for discovery, clinical care, and translational research purposes. Dr. Shon will also review promising approaches coupling the generation of NGS data with clinical data for the systematic application of translational knowledge for precision medicine.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

    John Shon is VP of Bioinformatics and Data Sciences at Illumina. In this role he leads a global team of bioinformatics scientists in developing algorithms and methods for Illumina NGS instruments and assays. As part of the Enterprise Informatics business unit, he also leads bioinformatics for clinical interpretation and translational informatics software. Prior to Illumina, Dr. Shon has over a decade of experience in large pharmaceutical companies, most recently as VP of Informatics, Research IT, and External Innovation at Janssen Pharmaceuticals (a division of J&J) where he supported R&D, clinical development, and Janssen Diagnostic’s teams. At Roche, Dr. Shon led informatics groups in translational research for target discovery, biomarker selection, drug safety, and personalized healthcare.

    REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION:

    Individuals with disabilities who need sign language interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Kristan Brown at kristan.brown@nih.gov or 301-402-9818 and/or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339) at least 5 business days prior to the event.

  • 14
    Mar

    Data Science Distinguished Seminar Series - Carlos Bustamante, Models & Data in Biomedicine: What’s Real and What’s Noise?

    March 14, 2016

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science invites you to attend the following lecture as part of the NIH Data Science Distinguished Seminar Series:

    TITLE: "Models and Data in Biomedicine: What’s Real and What’s Noise? And, Why Should We Care?"

    SPEAKER: Dr. Carlos Bustamante, Ph.D., Inaugural Chair of Stanford University's new Department of Biomedical Data Science

    DATE: Monday, March 14, 2016, 1:00pm – 2:00pm EST

    LOCATION: Lipsett Auditorium, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    This lecture will be videocast here.

    ABSTRACT:

    If you think of a scatterplot of data overlaid with a model for the data and ask practitioners from different fields, “what’s noise and what’s real?,” the answers may surprise you. To a biologist, the data will almost surely be “what’s real” and the model is a poor approximation to the “truth.” To a physicist, the model is probably “what’s real” and the data is just a noisy realization of an underlying true physical process that we are attempting to study. As we think about the biomedical data enterprise in the 21st century and the massive amounts of data we generate (and want to analyze!), we need to support multiple world views and have guidance on how to translate noisy data and noisy models into actionable information. Dr. Bustamante's presentation will draw upon several examples from Population Genetics (a field very rich in theory) and Genomics (a field not so rich in theory and much more data driven) to illustrate these points. It will also touch upon reproducible research and the question of how  funding agencies need to support ecosystems for collaborative research, including data producers, consortia, and so called "research parasites” that may want to use the data in ways that go beyond what the original experimental designers envisioned.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

    Dr. Carlos Bustamante is a population geneticist whose research focuses on analyzing genome-wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. From 2002-2009, he was on the faculty at Cornell University, in the Departments of Statistical Sciences and Biology Statistics and Computational Biology, where he was promoted to full professor in 2008. Since 2010, he has been on the faculty in the Department of Genetics at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He has received multiple honors and awards including a Marshall-Sherfield Fellowship (2001-2), the Sloan Research Fellowship (2007), and a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship (2010). He has trained over 50 post-doctoral fellows and graduate students as primary advisor and co-authored over 130 papers. Much of his research is located at the interface of computational biology, mathematical genetics, and evolutionary genomics. His most current research focuses on human population genomics and global health, including developing statistical, computational, and genomic resources for enabling trans- and multi-ethnic genome-wide association and medical sequencing studies of complex biomedical traits. He is one of the Principal Investigators of the recently announced $25M ClinGen project to build the country's National Database of Clinically Relevant Genomic Variants.

    ADDITIONAL EVENT DETAILS: 

    This lecture is part of a full day of scheduled events and activities for the second annual NIH Pi Day, which celebrates the intersection between the quantitative and biomedical sciences. Pi Day is an annual international celebration of the irrational number Pi, 3.14..., on March 14. On Pi Day and every day, NIH recognizes the importance of building a diverse biomedical workforce with the quantitative skills required to tackle future challenges. For more information, visit the event page at https://datascience.nih.gov/PiDay2016

    REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION:

    Individuals with disabilities who need Sign Language Interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Kristan Brown at kristan.brown@nih.gov or 301-402-9818 or the Federal Relay (800-877-8339) at least 5 business days prior to the event.

  • 14
    Mar

    Pi Day @ NIH Celebration

    March 14, 2016

    Pi Day @ NIH is a full day of scheduled events and activities to celebrate the intersection between the quantitative and biomedical sciences. Pi Day is an annual international celebration of the irrational number Pi, 3.14..., on March 14. On Pi Day and every day, NIH recognizes the importance of building a diverse biomedical workforce with the quantitative skills required to tackle future challenges. For more information, visit the event page at https://datascience.nih.gov/PiDay2016

  • 15
    Feb

    President's Day - National Holiday

    February 15, 2016

    On Monday, February 15, 2016, the Federal Government will be closed in observance of the President's Day national holiday.

  • 11
    Feb

    BCIG Lecture - From Machine Learning to Machine Understanding: New Frontiers

    February 11, 2016

    Machine learning" is, of course,  a well established discipline and a recognizable term while "machine understanding" is in the early development stage and enjoys little name recognition. Nonetheless, there have been advances in that area pointing towards some  novel approaches in machine intelligence that are yet to be explored. This research also sheds some light on and raises new questions regarding neuronal underpinnings of the understanding capacity in the humans. 

    BCIG Lecture: From Machine Learning to Machine Understanding: New Frontiers

    Speaker: Yan Yufik

    Date/Time: February 11, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Location: TBA

    Topic: Self Organization in the Nervous System

    Contact: Jim DeLeo (BCIG Chair)

  • 9
    Feb

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture - Barend Mons, Open Science as a Social Machine

    February 9, 2016

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science invites you to attend the following lecture as part of the NIH Frontiers in Data Science Lecture Series:

    TITLE: "Open Science as a Social Machine"

    SPEAKER: Dr. Barend Mons, Ph.D.

    DATE: Tuesday, February 9, 2016, 10:00am-11:00am

    LOCATION: Natcher Conference Center, Room F1/F2

    This lecture will be videocast here.

    ABSTRACT:

    Barend Mons is Chair of the European Commission's High Level Expert Group for the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). The EOSC is meant to be a supporting expert infrastructure for Open Science. In this presentation, Dr. Mons will cover the aspects of open and participatory science in which community curation and annotation of data is key. He will emphasize the joint responsibility for data stewardship in Open Science. He will explain the concepts of Nanopublication, the Explicitome, and the concept of FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Re-usable) data and other research objects with an emphasis on machine actionability of published research objects. Finally, Dr. Mons will outline the future developments of social machines in science and how users and producers of data merge into knowledge creation communities where man-machine interaction is key. Examples will be from his own field: Human Genetics.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

    Barend Mons is a Molecular Biologist by training (Ph.D., Leiden University, 1986) and spent over 15 years in Malaria research. After that, he gained experience in computer-assisted knowledge discovery, which remains his research focus. He spent time with the European Commission (1993-1996) and with the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). Dr. Mons has also co-founded several spin off companies. Currently, Dr. Mons is Professor of Biosemantics at the Human Genetics Department of Leiden University Medical Center, is Head of Node for ELIXIR-NL at the Dutch Techcentre for Life Sciences, Integrator of Life Sciences at the Netherlands eScience Center, and Board member of the Leiden Centre of Data Science. In 2014, Dr. Mons initiated the FAIR data initiative, and in 2015, was appointed Chair of the European Commission's High Level Expert Group for the European Open Science Cloud. For Dr. Mons' publication and citation record for the FAIR data initiative, see: http://www.dtls.nl/fair-data/ and for Nanopublications, see: www.nanopub.org.

    REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION:

    Individuals with disabilities who need Sign Language Interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Kristan Brown at kistan.brown@nih.gov or 301-402-9816 and/or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339) at least 5 business days prior to the event.

  • 29
    Jan

    Frontiers in Data Science Lecture - High-Performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE): A Regulatory NGS Data Analysis Platform

    January 29, 2016

    The Office of the Associate Director for Data Science invites you to attend the following lecture as part of the NIH Frontiers in Data Science Lecture Series:

    TITLE:  “High-Performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE): A Regulatory NGS Data Analysis Platform”

    DATE:  Friday, January, 29 2016, 10:00AM – 11:00AM

    LOCATION:  NIH Main Campus, Building 35A, Room 640

    This lecture will be videocast here.

    SPEAKERS:  Vahan Simonyan, Ph.D., HIVE Lead Scientist at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Raja Mazumder, Ph.D., HIVE Lead Scientist at George Washington University (GW)

    ABSTRACT:  

    The abundance of miscellaneous high-performance computational platforms available across academia, the healthcare industry, and in government organizations isn't doing much to close the gap between research and regulatory analytics.  Extra iterations for drug, device, and biologics approval processes are causing a significant cost increase for medical product development.  High-Performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE), co-developed by FDA and GW, presents a great opportunity for serving as a bridge.  It is authorized as a regulatory NGS data analysis platform and provides unique capability for healthcare stakeholders to look into NGS data from the regulatory perspective of FDA.

    As a distributed storage and computation environment and a multicomponent cloud infrastructure, HIVE provides secure web access for authorized users to deposit, retrieve, annotate, and compute biomedical big data and to analyze the outcomes using web interface visual environments appropriately built in collaboration with internal and external end users.  In addition to the initial HIVE applications to next generation sequencing, the current universe of HIVE projects covers tailor-made applications involving dimensionality analysis, federated and integrated data mapping, modeling, and simulations that are applicable to basic research, biostatistics, epidemiology, clinical studies, post-market evaluation, manufacturing consistency, environmental metagenomics, outbreak detection, and more.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

    Vahan Simonyan, Ph.D. is the HIVE Lead Scientist at FDA, an author to more than 50 scientific publications in quantum physics and chemistry, nanotechnology, biotechnology, population dynamics, and bioinformatics. The technology developed by Dr. Simonyan and the code-base donated to the U.S. Government has launched HIVE at FDA. This resulted in an enormous success resulting in a regulatory compliant R&D IT platform capable of handling peta-scale data from sequencing projects, post-market analytics, clinical, and preclinical data analysis. Currently Dr. Simonyan's collaborations span the scope of +80 medium to large research and regulatory projects with scientists from government organizations, large healthcare consortia, and academia.

    Raja Mazumder, Ph.D. is the HIVE Lead Scientist at GW, an Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, and Director of the McCormick Genomic & Proteomic Center at GW. Prior to joining GW, Raja was faculty at Georgetown University where he worked on the UniProt project as a Team Lead with colleagues from the European Bioinformatics Institute and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics. Prior to Georgetown, Raja worked at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) as a Bioinformatics Scientist.

    REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION:

    Individuals with disabilities who need Sign Language Interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Kristan Brown at kristan.brown@nih.gov or 301-402-9816 and/or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339) at least 5 business days prior to the event.

  • 18
    Jan

    Martin Luther King Day - National Holiday

    January 18, 2016

    On Monday, January 18, 2016, the Federal Government will be closed in observance of the Martin Luther King Day national holiday.

  • 11
    Jan

    BD2K Multi-Council Working Group - January 2016

    January 11, 2016

    Notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Big Data to Knowledge Multi-Council Working Group.

    The teleconference meeting will be open to the public as indicated below. Individuals who plan to attend and need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the contact person listed below in advance of the meeting.

    Name of Working Group:  Big Data to Knowledge Multi-Council Working Group

    Date:  January 11, 2016

    Open Session:  11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    Agenda:  Discussion will review current Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) activities and newly proposed BD2K initiatives.

    Open Session Presentations:

    Place:  Teleconference

    This meeting is open to the public but is being held by teleconference only. No physical meeting location is provided for any interested individuals to listen to committee discussions. Any individual interested in listening to the meeting discussions must call: 1-866-692-3158 and use Passcode: 2956317, for access to the meeting.

    Closed Session:  12:10pm - 3:30pm

    Agenda:  Discussion will focus on review of proposed Funding Plans for BD2K Funding Opportunity Announcements.

    Contact Person:  Tonya Scott, email: tonya.scott@nih.gov, phone: 301-402-9817.

    Information is also available on the Office of the Associate Director for Data Science's home page: https://datascience.nih.gov/index where an agenda and any additional information for the meeting will be posted when available.

    Office of The Director, National Institutes of Health; Notice of Meeting

  • 1
    Jan

    New Year's Day - National Holiday

    January 1, 2016

    On Friday, January 1, 2016, the Federal Government will be closed in observance of the New Year's Day national holiday.

  • 18
    Nov

    The Future of the Commons: Data, Software, and Beyond

    November 18, 2015

    The Future of the Commons: Data, Software, and Beyond

    One-Day Workshop Co-sponsored by CENDI, NFAIS, & RDA

    **  Wednesday, November 18, 2015, 9:00 am - 4:30 pm  **

    Hosted by the Board on Research Data and Information & 
    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

    National Academies of Sciences, Engineering & Medicine
    Keck Center, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Room 100, Washington, DC

    REGISTRATION FEES

    CENDI, NFAIS, ICSTI, RDA/US, or NAS Members: $125.00

    Non-members: $150.00

    For more information, visit: http://cendievents.infointl.com/CENDI_NFAIS_RDA_2015/wrkshp_reg.html  

  • 9
    Nov

    Biomedical Visual Search and Deep Learning Workshop

    November 9, 2015

    Recent developments in neural networks (or deep learning) for visual recognition have attracted the interest of internet search engines and social media sites. This interest has been driven by a desire to efficiently analyze visual content in images to help generate searchable tags enabling automated classification of the images. 

    The biological and biomedical science communities are rife with examples of research and clinical image data that needs to be manually classified, ranging from segmenting and annotating digital pathology images to tracking masses in digital breast tomosynthesis. A large percentage of time and effort of highly trained medical professionals is spent on manual or semi-automated identification of regions of interest. There is an urgent need to develop unsupervised or minimally supervised approaches to identifying various regions of interest within biomedical images and to the classification and generation of metadata for archived images. Besides the obvious advantages of saving time and effort, such approaches can enable the development of a biomedical visual search engine which will allow researchers and clinicians to scan through large datasets and find appropriate sets of images of interest.

    This workshop is held in conjunction with the IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedicine (BIBM)

    Workshop Website: http://www.nibib.nih.gov/news-events/meetings-events/biomedical-visual-search-and-deep-learning-workshop

    Important dates:

    • Sept 1, 2015: Due date for full workshop papers submission
    • Sept 30, 2015: Notification of paper acceptance to authors
    • Oct 17, 2015: Camera-ready of accepted papers
    • Nov 9-12, 2015: Workshops

    Submission:

  • 5
    Nov

    Got Data? Building a Sustainable Ecosystem for Data Driven Research

    November 5, 2015

    TITLE:  Got Data? Building a Sustainable Ecosystem for Data Driven Research

    DATE: Thursday, November 5, 2015, 4 – 5PM

    LOCATION: NIH Main Campus, Building 35A Room 620/630. The event will be broadcasted live at https://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=17555&bhcp=1

    SPEAKER:  Dr. Francine Berman, Chair, Research Data Alliance / US, and Hamilton Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, RPI

    ABSTRACT:

    Innovation in a digital world presupposes that the data will be there when you need it, but will it? Without sufficient data infrastructure and attention to the stewardship and preservation of digital data, data may become inaccessible or lost. This is particularly problematic for data generated by sponsored research projects where the focus is on innovation rather than infrastructure, and support for stewardship and preservation may be short-term. In this presentation, Dr. Fran Berman discusses sustainability, infrastructure, and data, and explores the opportunities and challenges of creating a viable ecosystem for the data on which current and future research and innovation increasingly depend.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

    Dr. Francine Berman is the Edward P. Hamilton Distinguished Professor in Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She is a Fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In 2009, Dr. Berman was the inaugural recipient of the ACM/IEEE-CS Ken Kennedy Award for "influential leadership in the design, development, and deployment of national-scale cyberinfrastructure." 

Dr. Berman is U.S. lead of the Research Data Alliance (RDA), a community-driven international organization created to accelerate research data sharing world-wide.  She also serves as Chair of the Anita Borg Institute Board of Trustees, as co-Chair of the NSF Advisory Committee for the Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Directorate, as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Sloan Foundation, and as a member of the Board of Directors of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).  

    Previously, Dr. Berman served as Director of the San Diego Supercomputer Center and as Vice President for Research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She also served as co-Chair of the National Academies Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI), as co-Chair of the US-UK Blue Ribbon Task Force for Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access, as Chair of the Information, Computing and Communication Section (Section T) of the AAAS, and as a member of the NIGMS Advisory Council. For her accomplishments, leadership, and vision, Dr. Berman was recognized by the Library of Congress as a "Digital Preservation Pioneer", as one of the top women in technology by BusinessWeek and Newsweek, and as one of the top technologists by IEEE Spectrum.

     

  • 28
    Oct

    Data-level Metrics

    October 28, 2015

    This webinar will be co-sponsored by NCI as part of the CBIIT Speaker Series.

    Martin Fenner is the DataCite Technical Director since August 2015. From 2012 to 2105 he was technical lead for the PLOS Article-Level Metrics project. Martin has a medical degree from the Free University of Berlin and is a Board-certified medical oncologist.

    Abstract: The DataONE repository network, California Digital Library and Public Library of Science (PLOS) from October 2014 - October 2015 work on a NSF-funded project to explore metrics -  including citations, downloads and social media -  for about 150,000 datasets. This presentation will summarize the major hurdles to make this work, the most important findings, and some ideas to go forward, including implementation as a production service.

    Date/Time: October 28, 2015, 11AM - 12PM

    Location: Webinar

    On-site location: NCI, Shady Grove room 2W910 - 912

    For more information, please visit the event page at https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/display/CBIITSpeakers/2015/10/18/October+28%3A+Martin+Fenner%2C+Data-Level+Metrics

     

     

  • 22
    Oct

    Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away

    October 22, 2015

    Volunteers will give brief summaries of sections of the book and then all who are interested will sit in a circle and engage in dialogue about the book. We will end no later than 7:30 p.m. because that’s the time we must give up the room. Then those interested will go to dinner in Bethesda.

    Speaker: Jim DeLeo, Computer Scientist, NIH Clinical Center

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50, Room 1227/1233

    Contact: Jim DeLeo, 301-496-3848

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 19
    Oct

    NIH Digital Summit: Optimizing Digital to Reach Patients, Scientists, Clinicians, and the Public

    October 19, 2015

    The National Institutes of Health is excited to present their first digital summit, developed to explore how patients, health professionals, and researchers are getting and sharing health and science information in today’s technology-driven world. The summit is designed to encourage discussion, so come prepared to ask questions in person or virtually and we welcome you to use the hashtag #NIHDigital to join the conversation online.

    This summit  is open to the public and registration is required for in-person attendance. Register for the event here: http://www.nih.gov/news/events/digital-summit.htm. Researchers, health professionals, and communications professionals interested in digital health are all encouraged to attend.    

    Date/Time: Monday, October 19, 2015, 9:00 a.m. ET – 3:00 p.m ET

    Location: Lipsett Amphitheater at the NIH Clinical Research Center (Building 10)

    Videocast: **A live Web cast will be available at videocast.nih.gov. No registration is necessary for the videocast.** 

     

    AGENDA:

    Morning Session (9:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.)

    Welcome and Introduction

    Keynote speaker: Susannah Fox, Chief Technology Officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    Panel 1: The patient and caregiver perspective: Managing health conditions using digital tools and social media.

    Panel 2: Reaching patients and the public where they are: Sharing high quality, evidence-based information with the public on social media, blogs, and mobile apps.

     

    Afternoon Session (1:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.)

    Panel 3: The health professional perspective: Using social media to get and share information and interact with other professionals and patients.

    Panel 4: The scientist's perspective: Using digital and social media to collaborate, share ideas, and communicate research to the public.

     

    ABOUT THE KEYNOTE: Susannah Fox is the Chief Technology Officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She is responsible for helping HHS leadership harness the power of data, technology, and innovation to improve the health and welfare of the nation. Together with the IDEA Lab team, she creates opportunities for entrepreneurship across the HHS workforce. Susannah most recently served as the Entrepreneur-in-Residence at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, helping to catalyze new ways to think about challenges and develop solutions that deliver impact. From 2000-2014, Susannah was an Associate Director of the Internet Project at the Pew Research Center where she helped quantify and explain the social impact of the internet. She pioneered participatory research methods at the Center in order to explore how information technology and social media affect the health care industry and the consumer health care experience, with a special focus on people living with chronic and rare conditions.

    Registration is required for in-person attendance. Sign language interpreters will be provided. Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodation to participate in this lecture should contact Yasmine Kloth, NCCIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison, at 301-451-6579, or Yasmin.Kloth@nih.gov, or the Federal TTY Relay number (1-800-877-8339).

  • 19
    Oct

    NIH Digital Summit

    October 19, 2015

    The National Institutes of Health is hosting a summit to explore how digital is being used by government agencies, clinicians, scientists, patients, and the public to communicate information on health and science.

    Date: Monday October 19, 2015

    Location: Masur Auditorium, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD

    Website: http://www.nih.gov/news/events/digital-summit.htm

    Registration: This event is free and open to the public. Please register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nih-digital-summit-2015-optimizing-digital-to-reach-patients-scientists-clinicians-and-the-public-registration-17713373176

    Visitor information is available at http://www.nih.gov/about/visitor.

  • 14
    Oct

    2015 NIH Regional Seminar

    October 14, 2015

    A busy 2 days of sessions and interactive opportunities with NIH & HHS experts, especially for those who choose to take advantage of one or more of our optional pre-seminar workshops. 

    2015 NIH Regional Seminar on Program Funding & Grants Administration

    Dates: October 14-16, 2015

    Location: San Diego, CA

    Website: http://regionalseminars.od.nih.gov/sandiego2015/registration/

    Registration: Registration is underway at http://regionalseminars.od.nih.gov/sandiego2015/registration/

    Through September 11, ALL potential attendees can save with General Registration Rate.  In addition, Grad students, Predocs and Postdocs can take advantage of a special $50 trainee discount throughout the registration period – as long as space is available!  Reserve your spot today (and don’t forget to reserve your room through our Regional Seminar Travel/Hotel page to get a special rate through Sept. 11)!  

  • 7
    Oct

    Integrating multi-scale data for biomedical discovery and clinical implementation

    October 7, 2015

    Russell Altman, M.D., Ph.D. from Stanford University will give The Inaugural Annual Donald A.B. Lindberg and Donald West King Lecture In Medical Informatics and/or Pathobiology

     

     

    Title: “Integrating multi-scale data for biomedical discovery and clinical implementation”

    Date/Time: October 7, 2015 1:00 p.m.

    Location: Masur Auditorium, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

  • 30
    Sep

    Interindividual Variability: New Ways to Study and Implications for Decision-Making

    September 30, 2015

    Within any population, factors such as heritable characteristics, stress, body weight, and genetics can influence the type and degree of response that people may have to environmental stressors.  Accounting for this interindividual variability is a challenge for decision makers tasked with setting chemical safety regulations. This National Academy of Sciences Workshop will focus on recent scientific advances that could help elucidate the sources of interindividual variation. Join researchers, professionals, and policy experts to explore new tools and how they may be used to advance the science behind risk-based decisions. This workshop is part of the NAS Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions series sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and will also be webcast. 

    Title: Interindividual Variability: New Ways to Study and Implications for Decision-Making

    Dates: September 30 – October 1, 2015

    Location: NAS Keck Center, Room 100, 500 5th Street NW, Washington, DC

    Registration: On-site and webcast registration is required http://nas-sites.org/emergingscience/meetings/interindividual-variability/  

    Topics:

    The workshop will include presentations, panel discussions, and breakout sessions on topics such as:

    •       in-vitro toxicology methods using highly diverse cell lines;

    •       in-vivo methods using highly diverse animal populations;

    •       epidemiologic analytical approaches which explore mediators within the causal pathway.

  • 30
    Sep

    NIH Common Data Elements (CDE) Initiatives Overview Workshop

    September 30, 2015

    Planning Committee:

    OD:  Phil Bourne, Jennie Larkin, Leslie Derr, Angel Horton, Sonynka Ngosso

    NLM:  Betsy Humphreys, Mike Huerta, Lisa Lang, Jerry Sheehan

    NCI:   Warren Kibbe, Sherri De Coronado, Dianne Reeves, Denise Warzel

    NCATS:   Elaine Collier

    NIEHS:   Cindy Lawler

    Agenda

    Executive Summary

    BD2K, BMIC, NLM, NCI, NCATS, and NIEHS jointly organized a workshop for NIH staff to explore the role of CDEs in NIH Data Sharing. This workshop convened 40 representatives of the NIH community that were interested in CDEs with the goals of:

    • Supporting NIH-wide understanding of current activities and opportunities related to CDEs.
    • Identify current barriers/challenges for the adoption and use of CDEs by NIH-funded researchers, both intramural and extramural.
    • Identify possible ways to modify development, implementation, and use of CDEs to increase adoption and value to research.
    • Identify incentives and opportunities for involvement of relevant communities in CDE development, use, and re-use.
    • Develop evaluation plans for CDEs to test their assumed utility.
    • Identify opportunities to improve coordination in the development of CDEs for research use and in infrastructure for developing and making them accessible.
    • Determine how best to support CDE activities in the context of BD2K.

    NIH Common Data Element (CDE) Initiatives Overview Pre-Workshop Webinar

    Prior to the workshop, a preparatory webinar was held on September 8, 2015.  This webinar included presentations from several ongoing CDE programs by NIH staffs that are engaged in the BMIC CDE Working Group.

    Webcast Recording and Meeting Slides

  • 24
    Sep

    Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies

    September 24, 2015

    This book addresses risks and promises related to AI-based superintelligence, and strategies to manage them. Volunteers will give brief summaries of sections of the book and then all who are interested will sit in a circle and engage in dialogue about the book. We will end no later than 7:30 p.m. because that’s the time we must give up the room. Then those interested will go to dinner in Bethesda.

    Speaker: Jim DeLeo, Computer Scientist, NIH Clinical Center

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50, Room 1227/1233

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 24
    Sep

    USPTO PatentsView Inventor Disambiguation Technical Workshop

    September 24, 2015

    On September 24th, the Office of Chief Economist of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is sponsoring a workshop presenting cutting-edge approaches in data methods. This is an exciting event for our Open Data efforts as well as our broader support for research on innovation and invention. The workshop will present the results of independent efforts to create new computational methods for uniquely identifying inventors.

    USPTO PatentsView Inventor Disambiguation Technical Workshop

    Date: September 24, 2015

    Location: Madison Auditorium, US Patent & Trademark Office HQ, 600 Dulaney St. Alexandria, VA

    Website: http://www.dev.patentsview.org/workshop/

    This is a public event

    The Office of Chief Economist at USPTO is actively working to facilitate the development of new computational methods to uniquely identify inventors across datasets of patent applications and grants. Unique inventor identifiers contribute substantially to the value and utility of US patent data. The goal of the PatentsView Inventor Disambiguation Technical Workshop is to encourage the development of novel approaches to reveal inventor identities across nearly 40 years of US patent data.

    The workshop seeks to identify researchers who have the capacity to develop and apply these new methods to USPTO data. Each team is to submit their inventor name disambiguation algorithm for evaluation by a panel of expert judges. The team with the algorithm that scores the highest will receive a $25,000 stipend to support that team’s work and their technical guidance for integration of the algorithm into the USPTO PatentsView data platform.

    The workshop event on September 24 will present the evaluation results and engage more broadly with the open data community. 

    Please send all inquiries to cssip@air.org.

  • 21
    Sep

    Recent Developments in Artificial Intelligence - Lessons from the Private Sector

    September 21, 2015

    Please join us for a Frontiers in Data Science Seminar. Andrew Moore is the Dean of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. His areas of research and expertise include decision and control algorithms, statistical machine learning, artificial intelligence, robotics, and statistical computation for large volumes of data. Andrew more previously served as the VP of Engineering at Google Pittsburg where he was responsible for the retail segment: Google Shopping. Andrew was involved with a number of Google/University activities, two examples of which were Google Sky (in collaboration with CMU, Hubble Space Telescope Center and University of Washington) and the Android SkyMap app.

    Photograph of Andrew Moore Dean of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University

    Andrew Moore, Ph.D.

    Dean of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University

    Title: Recent Developments in Artificial Intelligence - Lessons from the Private Sector

    September 21, 2015 12:00-1:00 pm
    Lipsett Auditorium, NIH Main Campus Bldg 10

    This talk is co-sponsored by the Office of the Associate Director for Data Science and the National Library of Medicine.

    Abstract: Andrew more will discuss some of the big developments in computer science from the perspective of someone crossing over from industry to academia. He will talk about roadmaps for AI-based consumer and advice products in the commercial world and contrast with some of the potentially viable roadmaps in healthcare. Andrew more will also touch on entity stores (aka knowledge graphs), question answering and ultra-large data center architectures.

    Videocast Information for this lecture will be available soon.

     

  • 21
    Sep

    JHU DaSH - Data Science Hackathon

    September 21, 2015

    Join a team of data scientists to tackle a real-world, cutting-edge problems!

    The NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) program and the NIH Library are pleased to join the Johns Hopkins (JHU) Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Biostatistics in announcing the first JHU DaSH – Data Science Hackathon.

    This event will be an opportunity for data scientists and data scientists-in-training to get together and hack on real-world problems collaboratively and to learn from each other. The DaSH will feature data scientists from government, academia, and industry presenting problems and describing challenges in their respective areas. There will also be a number of networking opportunities where attendees can get to know each other. We think this will be fun event and we encourage people from all areas, including students (graduate and undergraduate), to attend.

    Location: Baltimore, MD

    Dates: September 21-23, 2015

    Event Website: https://regonline.com/jhudash.

    Application (NIH Staff and Trainees): This event requires application. NIH staff or trainees who would like to attend should complete the application at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NIH-JHUDaSH (no later than Aug 14th) rather than the one on the https://regonline.com/jhudash website. For questions, contact Lisa Federer (lisa.federer@nih.gov) in the NIH Library. 

    Application (Non-NIH): This event requires application. Non-affiliates of NIH should apply directly through https://regonline.com/jhudash.

  • 17
    Sep

    Mind the Gap: Using administrative and claims data to answer your research question

    September 17, 2015

    Please join us for a cyberseminar from the VA Information Resource Center. Todd Wagner is the Director of the VA Health Economics Resource Center and the Associate director for the Center for Innovation to Implementation at the Palo Alto, VA. 

    Title: Mind the Gap: Using administrative and claims data to answer your research question

    Date/Time: September 17, 2015 2:00pm-3:00pm ET

    Location: Web

    Abstract: Todd Wagner, Ph.D., focuses on identifying clinical, administrative, claims and census data that may contain information related to your research questions, strengths and limitations of EHR data sources commonly used for research, data linkage methods within large VHA data sources, examples from the presenter’s research.

    Registration: Registration is required for this event. Please go to https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8913609193356891394

    Target audience: New research investigators, coordinators, statisticians, programmers, and analysts.

  • 17
    Sep

    Accessibility & Usability in Health Information Technology (HIT)

    September 17, 2015

    To advance the priority of accessibility in HIT systems and tools from a compliance-­‐oriented approach toward one that is user-­‐driven, responsive to human-­‐centered consumer experiences, and results in increased patient engagement and improved health and wellness for individual disabilities, older adults, and caregivers.

    Accessibility & Usability in Health Information Technology (HIT): A Research and Action Conference to Empower People with Disabilities, Older Adults, and Caregivers

    Dates: September 17-18, 2015

    Location: U.S. Department of Education, Potomac Center Plaza, 10th Floor Auditorium, 550 12th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20202

    Website: http://icdr.acl.gov/AHIT/

    Registration: https://events-na8.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1108472965/en/events/event/shared/1109360827/event_landing.html?sco-id=1656666512&_charset_=utf-8

    Objectives:

    • To elevate the importance of accessibility and usability in the nation’s HIT agenda to better meet the needs of individuals with disabilities, older adults, caregivers, and providers.
    • To exchange perspectives among diverse stakeholder groups and identify barriers and potential levers of change for creating an accessible HIT ecosystem.
    • To highlight the latest research findings and identify best practices and actionable strategies that advance knowledge about health care methods, models, and tools associated with accessible, interoperable and person-centered health IT systems.
    • To catalyze new research and development initiatives and collaborative partnerships that move the accessible HIT agenda forward to achieving the Triple Aim of improved patient care, reduced costs, and improved health outcomes for individuals with disabilities, older adults and caregivers.

    Who Should Attend?

    Disability, aging, accessibility, and HIT researchers and developers, policymakers, government and industry representatives, aging and disability advocates, providers, people with disabilities, older adults and caregivers. Seating is limited so please register early and plan to participate in the entire conference.

    Background:

    The United States is moving rapidly to develop and implement smart, interconnected, health information technology (HIT) ecosystems geared to improving both the quality of care and the health of the Nation as well as to reducing costs. With the creation of health information technologies, such as electronic and personal health records (EHRs/PHRs), mobile and telehealth technology, cloud-based services, medical devices, remote monitoring devices, assistive technologies, and the underlying infrastructure that enables the exchange, consumers and health care providers can access and use HIT systems and tools to inform decision-making, support coordinated health management, and to engage as partners to improve health outcomes. However, to deliver on the “promise” of HIT for all Americans, including persons with disabilities, older adults and caregivers, electronic health information must be both accessible and usable for providers and consumers alike. Having accurate and accessible health information available when, where, and how it is needed is also pivotal for supporting the new person-centered health paradigm. This state of the science conference is devoted to advancing the accessible HIT agenda. Facilitated discussions among diverse stakeholder groups will identify gaps and barriers, and propose actionable solutions that will promote a shared culture of inclusion and person-centered care.

    Conference Products:

    Archived Presentations
    Conference Proceedings
    Journal Publication Submission

  • 16
    Sep

    Data Analysis with Pipes

    September 16, 2015

    Please join us for a Frontiers in Data Science Seminar.  Hadley Wickham, Ph.D., Chief Scientist at RStudio and Adjunct Assistant Professor at Rice University is the author of several of the most revolutionary, influential, and popular software packages for the R statistical software environment including dplyr, ggplot2, reshape2, and numerous others.

    Photograph of Hadley Wickham

    Hadley Wickham, Ph.D.

    Chief Scientist, R Studio and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Rice University

    Title: Data Analysis with Pipes

    September 16, 2015 2:30-3:30 pm
    NIH Bldg 40 Room 1201/1203

    This talk is co-sponsored by the Office of the Associate Director for Data Science and the National Cancer Institute.

    Abstract: Over the last year and half, three things have had a profound impact on how I develop tools for data analysis: Rcpp, writing the advanced R book (http://adv-r.had.co.nz/) and the pipe operator (%>%, from magrittr). In this talk, I'll focus on the pipe operator and how it’s influenced the development of tidyr, dplyr and ggvis, the next generation of reshape2, plyr and ggplot2. Come along to learn about why I think pipelines are awesome and see how pipelines + tidyr, dplyr, and ggvis can make your data analysis fast, fluent and fun.
     

    This event will not be videocast but remote participants may join the live webmeeting at https://webmeeting.nih.gov/bd2k.
    Call-in number: 1-(888) 971-0934, passcode: 32359385# 

  • 16
    Sep

    NIH Research Festival

    September 16, 2015

    Don't miss the many events that will occur during the Festival: plenary sessions, concurrent workshops, concurrent tours, poster sessions, the Green Labs Fair, the Technical Sales Association Vendor Show, and more. All events will take place in and around the NIH Clinical Center (Building 10) on the Bethesda campus. The full schedule for the Festival can be found on the Research Festival website, at http://researchfestival.nih.gov

  • 10
    Sep

    The Curse of Dimensionality and its Effect on Microarray Data: Challenges and Solutions

    September 10, 2015

    The NIH Biomedical Computing Interest Group (BCIG) welcomes Niraj Trivedi from NHGRI for a BCIG Lecture. Niraj will talk about how difficult it is to find differentially expressed genes from microarray data amongst all the false positive results that are generated.  He will describe a method that uses existing knowledge to help choose biologically relevant genes specific to a microarray experiment.

    Title: The Curse of Dimensionality and its Effect on Microarray Data:  Challenges and Solutions

    Date/Time: September 10, 2015 3:30-5:30 pm

    Location: Building 50, first floor Room 1227 / 1233 (Lobby)

    Speaker: Niraj Trivedi has received his M.S. In biomedical engineering from Case Western Reserve University and a second M.S. Degree in bioinformatics from Boston University.  After his years in academia and industry using microarray technology, Niraj is currently a bioinformatics data analyst at NHGRI.

    Directions: If you were to enter the NIH at the main gate on Rockville Pike just proceed straight into the NIH campus for one block and cross the street in the direction you are going.  You will come upon Building 50 on your left.  Enter the lobby and look for the conference room on your right.  If you are driving onto the NIH campus, there is a metered parking lot at the end of Building 50 on the left. (It might be a good idea to bring these directions with you.) 

    Pre-event Coffee Social: There is a terrific coffee shop and lounge area just inside the door to Building 50.  From 3:00 to 3:30 p.m., we will have an informal social gathering there.  All are welcome to attend.

    Post-event Dinner: If there is sufficient interest we will meet in a democratically selected restaurant in Bethesda around 6:00 p.m.

    Contact: For more information, please contact Jim DeLeo by e-mail at  jdeleo@nih.gov or by phone at 301-496-3848.

     

  • 10
    Sep

    ORIP/DPCPSI/OD Symposium on Linking Disease Model Phenotypes to Human Conditions

    September 10, 2015

    ORIP/DPCPSI/OD Symposium on Linking Disease Model Phenotypes to Human Conditions

    Dates: September 10-11, 2015

    Location: Fisher's Lane Auditorium

    Agenda and Registrationhttp://www.scgcorp.com/linkingdisease2015/

    The purpose of the meeting is to convene a colloquium on the current status of Phenomics and its role in closing the gap that exists between biomedical research and clinical medical practice. The wealth of whole organism, cellular, and molecular data generated in the research laboratory must be translated into clinically relevant knowledge that enables the physician to make the best possible treatment decisions. Phenomics is gaining momentum due to the availability of the complete genomes for many organisms as well as higher throughput methods to genetically modify model organism genomes and observe and record phenotypes. Disease models comprise some of the most important tools of biomedical research. The efficacy of the use of disease models is based upon the principles of evolutionary conservation between species, including conservation of pathogenic disease mechanisms. The lack of alignment of phenotypes between model species and humans has been a historic impediment to understanding disease processes. Further progress depends upon integration of clinical, biological and genomic data and development of the tools for identification and analysis of specific and amendable disease-causing molecular phenotypes of various diseases. This symposium is sponsored by the Division of Comparative Medicine at ORIP/DPCPSI/OD/NIH. 

    Session Topics: Current status of the human clinical phenotype ontology and terminology, and associated data annotation and use; Cross-species phenotype analysis and ontology; Large scale high throughput analysis of disease model phenotyping data and annotation of gene function; Linking disease-relevant phenotypes with physiologically relevant molecular pathways and networks; Clinical and experimental biology data integration, and the positioning of molecular phenotypes in the emerging field of precision medicine; Resources for submission, representation, analysis, and sharing of phenotypic and genomic information, development of resource identification and tracking to improve reproducibility and the tracking of resource utilization and trends.

    Organizing Committee: Oleg Mirochnitchenko (ORIP/NIH, MD), Harold Watson (ORIP/NIH, MD), Melissa Haendel (Oregon Health & Science University, OR), Olga Troyanskaya (Princeton University, NJ), Olivier Bodenreider  (NIH Library, MD), Yves Lussier (University of Arizona, AZ), Phil Bourne  (DS/NIH, MD), Janan Eppig (The Jackson Laboratory, ME), Mary Mullins (University of Pennsylvania, PA).

    Please, register early, space is limited!
    http://www.scgcorp.com/linkingdisease2015/

    For more information on meeting logistics and registration, contact: Mark A. Dennis at mdennis@scgcorp.com,
    P: (301) 670-4990, ext. 237
    F: (301) 670-3815

    For programmatic questions contact Oleg Mirochnitchenko at Oleg.Mirochnitchenko@nih.gov,
    P: (301) 435-0748

    Confirmed speakers include: Peter N. Robinson (Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Germany), Carol M. Hamilton (PhenX, NC), Rachel Richesson (Duke University, NC), Rex L. Chisholm (Northwestern University, IL), Melissa Haendel (Oregon University, OR), Damian Smedley (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK), Chris Mungall (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA), Caleb Webber (Oxford University, UK), Janan Eppig (The Jackson Laboratory, ME), Elissa Chessler (The Jackson Laboratory, ME), Derek Stemple (Welcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK), Ross Cagan (The Mount Sinai Hospital, NY), Olga Troyanskaya (Princeton University, NJ), Kara Dolinski (Princeton University, NJ) (Presenter), John Quackenbush (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, MA), Jason Moore (Dartmouth College, NH), Yves Lussier (Univ. of Arizona, AZ), Razelle Kurzrock (Univertsity of California San Diego, CA), Gail Herman (Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, OH), Calumn MacRae (Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, MA), Maryann Martone (University of California San Diego, CA), Nicole Washington (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA), Paul Thomas (University of Southern California, CA), Mary Mullins (University of Pennsylvania, PA), Olivier Bodenreider (NIH Library, Bethesda, MD), Phil Bourne (NIH, MD).  

    Individuals with disabilities who need Sign Language Interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact RegenerativeMedicine@lmbps.com or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339).

  • 8
    Sep

    2015 IMAG Multiscale Modeling (MSM) Consortium Meeting

    September 8, 2015

    The themes of this meeting are 1) biomedical multiscale modeling success stories and lessons learned 2) multiscale modeling implementation into medical simulators/trainers and 3) multiscale modeling for optimal disease diagnosis/treatment applications. This meeting is organized by the Interagency Modeling and Analysis Group (IMAG). 

    Title: 2015 IMAG Multiscale Modeling (MSM) Consortium Meeting

    Dates: September 8-10, 2015

    Location: Lister Hill, NIH Campus, Bethesda, MD

    Website: http://www.imagwiki.nibib.nih.gov/

    Registration Deadline: September 1, 2015

    Registration: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2015-imag-multiscale-modeling-consortium-tickets-17544718726

  • 2
    Sep

    Implementation and metrics of success of Federal Citizen Science Projects

    September 2, 2015

    Meeting Topic: Implementation and metrics of success of Federal Citizen Science Projects

    Date: September, 2nd, 2015

    Purpose: To discuss in an informal, Federal-only setting the barriers and challenges we face as Federal employees when implementing and measuring the outcomes and success of citizen science projects.  The meeting, consisting of brief topical presentations and follow up discussions, will be structured to encourage sharing stories about implementation and measurement challenges in federal citizen science, and discussion and identification of solutions to common issues.

    Audience: This meeting is not open to the general public. Only federal government employees are eligible to attend.

    If you are interested in attending, please email gabriel.rosenfeld@nih.gov ASAP as space will be limited.

  • 20
    Aug

    MD2K Seminar Series: Introduction to First Person Vision

    August 20, 2015

    Recent progress in miniaturizing digital cameras and improving battery life has created a growing market for wearable cameras, exemplified by products such as GoPro and Google Glass. At the same time, the field of computer vision, which is concerned with the automatic extraction of information about the world from images and video, has also made rapid progress due to the increasing availability of image data, increases in computational power, and the emergence of machine learning methods such as deep learning. The analysis of video captured from body-worn cameras is an emerging subfield of computer vision known as First Person Vision (FPV). FPV provides new opportunities to model and analyze human behavior, create personalized records of visual experiences, and improve the treatment of a broad range of mental and physical health conditions. In this talk I will provide an introduction to some of the concepts and methods from computer vision which underlie the analysis of first person videos. In particular, I will focus the automatic analysis of video to track the motion of the camera and recover the 3D geometry of the scene, recognize activities, and detect and recognize objects of interest. This seminar will also briefly discuss the role of visual attention in FPV. The presentation won’t assume any prior knowledge of computer vision. The second presentation will focus on specific FPV technologies in the context of the BD2K Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge Center (MD2K).

    Title: MD2K Seminar Series: Introduction to First Person Vision (Seminar 2-of-2)

    Date/Time:  Thursday, August 20 – 3:00 pm CT

    Presented by: Dr. James M. Rehg, Professor, College of Computing - Georgia Institute of Technology, Deputy Director, MD2K Center of Excellence for Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge

    WEB SEMINAR ROOM LINK:  https://bluejeans.com/750607023

    *The first part of the Seminar: Introduction to First Person Vision is archived on YouTube at https://youtu.be/9_98ys6955M

    Learning Objectives: Following the presentation, attendees will be able to:

    • Describe some basic analysis goals for first person video and identify some of the challenges posed by automatic video analysis
    • Summarize the relationship between the movement of a body-worn camera in 3D, the motion induced in a video sequence, and methods for estimating video motion
    • Outline a basic approach to activity recognition in first person video using either object or motion features, including the major system components and sources of error

    Readings:

    R. Szeliski, Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications, Chapters 6, 7, and 8
    E-book - http://szeliski.org/Book/.
    H. Wang and C. Schmid, Action Recognition with Improved Trajectories. In Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Computer Vision (ICCV 13), pp. 3551-3558, Sydney, Australia, Dec 2013.
    Paper - https://hal.inria.fr/hal-00873267/en.
    Source code - http://lear.inrialpes.fr/people/wang/improved_trajectories.
    H. Pirsiavash and D. Ramanan. Recognizing Activities of Daily Living in First-Person Camera Views. In Proc. IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR 12), Providence, RI, June 2012.
    Paper - http://www.ics.uci.edu/~dramanan/papers/ADL_2012.pdf.
    Source code and dataset - http://people.csail.mit.edu/hpirsiav/codes/ADLdataset/adl.html.

    About the Presenter: James M. Rehg (pronounced "ray") is a Professor in the School of Interactive Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he is co-Director of the Computational Perception Lab (CPL) and Director of the Center for Behavioral Imaging. He received his Ph.D. from CMU in 1995 and worked at the Cambridge Research Lab of DEC (and then Compaq) from 1995-2001, where he managed the computer vision research group. He received an NSF CAREER award in 2001 and a Raytheon Faculty Fellowship from Georgia Tech in 2005. He and his students have received best student paper awards at ICML 2005, BMVC 2010, Mobihealth 2014, and Face and Gesture 2015, and a 2013 Method of the Year Award from the journal Nature Methods. Dr. Rehg serves on the Editorial Board of the Intl. J. of Computer Vision, and he served as the Program co-Chair for ACCV 2012 and General co-Chair for CVPR 2009, and will serve as Program co-Chair for CVPR 2017. He has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific papers and holds 25 issued US patents. His research interests include computer vision, machine learning, pattern recognition, and robot perception. Dr. Rehg is the lead PI on an NSF Expedition to develop the science and technology of Behavioral Imaging, the measurement and analysis of social and communicative behavior using multi-modal sensing, with applications to developmental disorders such as autism. He also serves as the Deputy Director of the NIH Center of Excellence on Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge (MD2K). See www.cbs.gatech.edu and md2k.org  for details.

    The MD2K Seminar Series is a service of the MD2K Center of Excellence for Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge

  • 14
    Aug

    NIH Data Science Distinguished Seminar Series: BRAIN/BD2K Seminar

    August 14, 2015

    Towards solutions to experimental and computational challenges in neuroscience

    Christof Koch, Ph.D. 
President and Chief Scientific Officer, Allen Institute for Brain Science  
    Emery N. Brown, M.D., Ph.D. 
Professor of Computational Neuroscience and Health Sciences and Technology, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences
 MIT-Harvard Division of Health Sciences and Technology

    Drs. Koch and Brown will describe the computational or experimental challenges associated with Big Data in their respective domains of neuroscience. From the basic to applied realms, science is being transformed by the collection of data on increasingly finer resolutions, both spatially and temporally. Storing, accessing, and analyzing these data create numerous challenges as well as opportunities. 

    Location: Masur Auditorum, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    Videocast: This event will be videocast. To view the videocast please go to http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=16695&bhcp=1

    Attending the seminar: This is a public event at the National Institutes of Health. All individuals interested in the seminar may attend. If this will be your first time visiting the NIH we strongly encourage you to review the visitor information at http://www.nih.gov/about/visitor/index.htm and allow extra time for security and transit. Individuals with disabilities who need Sign Language Interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Sonynka Ngosso, at (301) 402-9816. Requests should be made at least 5 business days in advance of the event.

    About the Speakers:

    Photograph of Christof Koch
    Christof Koch, Ph.D.
    is the President and Chief Scientific Officer of the Allen Institute for Brain Science. His research interests include elucidating the biophysical mechanisms underlying neural computation, understanding the mechanisms and purpose of visual attentn, and uncovering the neural basis of consciousness and the subjective mind. Dr. Koch has published extensively, and his writings and interests integrate theoretical, computational and experimental neuroscience. His most recent book, Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist, blends science and memoir to explore topics in discovering the roots of consciousness. Stemming in part from a long-standing collaboration with the late Nobel Laureate Francis Crick, Koch authored the book The Quest for Consciousness: A Neurobiological Approach. He has also authored the technical books Biophysics of Computation: Information Processing in Single Neurons and Methods in Neuronal Modeling: From Ions to Networks, and served as editor for several books on neural modeling and information processing.

    Photograph of Emery Brown
     

    Emery N. Brown, M.D., Ph.D. is the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School; an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH); and the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Brown received his B.A. (magna cum laude) in Applied Mathematics from Harvard College, his M.A. and Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University and his M.D. (magna cum laude) from Harvard Medical School. Dr. Brown completed his internship in internal medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and his residency in anesthesiology at MGH.

    Dr. Brown is an anesthesiologist-statistician whose experimental research has made important contributions to understanding the neuroscience of how anesthetics act in the brain to create the states of general anesthesia, using the EEG to accurately monitor the anesthetic state and devising new approaches to precisely control the anesthetic state. Dr. Brown is also widely recognized for his statistics research in which he has developed statistical methods to analyze dynamic processes in neuroscience.

    Dr. Brown served on the NIH BRAIN Initiative Working Group and is member of the International Anesthesia Research Society Board of Trustees. Dr. Brown is the recipient of an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, an NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award, the 2011 Jerome Sacks Award from the National Institute of Statistical Science, 2015 Guggenheim Fellowship in Applied Mathematics and the American Society of Anesthesiologists 2015 Excellence in Research Award.

    He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the IEEE, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Arts Sciences. Dr. Brown is the first and only anesthesiologist to be elected a member of all three branches of the National Academies: the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine), the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. 

  • 13
    Aug

    The 2015 Big Data Workshop: Exploring Opportunities for Radiation Oncology in the Era of Big Data

    August 13, 2015

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) are co-sponsoring a two-day workshop for radiation oncology physicians and physicists focused on opportunities for radiation oncology in the era of big data. 

    The 2015 Big Data Workshop: Exploring Opportunities for Radiation Oncology in the Era of Big Data will provide a platform for leaders in big data projects to interact with their peers in radiation oncology research, quality assessment and clinical care. Presentations will include current big data cancer registries, safety and incident reporting systems, and other strategies that will have the greatest impact on radiation oncology research, quality assurance, safety and outcomes analysis/ CRE. Abstract submissions will be solicited for poster presentations.

    Date/Time: 
    Thursday, August 13, 2015   8:00am - 5:00pm
    Friday, August 14, 2015   8:00am - 12:30pm

    Location: Building 35, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    Registration Required: Federal employees no registration fee.
     
    Event URL:  https://www.astro.org/Meetings-and-Events/2015-Big-Data-Workshop/Index.aspx

    Event Contacts:

    Name:   Jacek Capala
    E-mail:   capalaj@mail.nih.gov
    Phone:   240-276-5690
     

    Name:   Bhadrasain Vikram
    E-mail:   vikramgota@gmail.com
    Phone:   240-276-5690

  • 4
    Aug

    Incorporating Mobile Exposure in mHealth Precision Medicine

    August 4, 2015

    An NIEHS Exposure Science and the Exposome Webinar Series event. 

    Title: Incorporating Mobile Exposure in mHealth Precision Medicine 

    Speaker: Santosh Kumar, PhD, University of Memphis

    Date/Time: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM EDT

    Register: to watch the live webcast of the webinar (http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/conference/exposome_webinar_082015/)

    These webinars are open to all. Please feel free to share the registration link provided below with your friends and colleagues.

    Abstract: In January 2015, President Obama unveiled the Precision Medicine Initiative – an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. Mobile Health (or mHealth) can significantly contribute to realizing this vision. Recent advances in wearable sensing and mobile computing have opened up unprecedented opportunities to quantify dynamic changes in an individual’s health state as well as key physical, biological, behavioral, social, and environmental factors that contribute to health and disease risk, anytime and anywhere. Such real-time monitoring can optimize care delivery via just-in-time mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Incorporating mobile exposure assessment (e.g., geoexposure, audio exposure, visual exposure, light exposure, chemical exposure, etc.) via wearables such as smartwatches can facilitate sensor-based triggering of mHealth interventions and thus improve temporal precision of mHealth Precision Medicine. This talk will describe the progress being made by the NIH Center of Excellence on Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge (http://md2k.org) towards the design of sensor-triggered just-in-time mHealth interventions.

    Accommodations for Disabilities: Individuals with disabilities who need accommodation to participate in this webinar should contact Yuxia Cui at voice telephone: 919-316-4756 or email: cuiy2@niehs.nih.gov. TTY users should contact the Federal TTY Relay Service at 800-877-8339. Requests should be made at least 5 days in advance of the event.

     

  • 3
    Aug

    NCBI Hackathon

    August 3, 2015

     

    Dates: August 3-5, 2015

    Location: Bethesda. MD area 

    Application Deadline: June 6, 2015

    Application Form

    NCBI will host its second genomics hackathon focusing on advancing bioinformatics analysis of next generation sequencing data. This event is for students, postdocs and investigators already engaged in the use of pipelines for genomic analyses from next generation sequencing data.* Working groups of 5-6 individuals will be formed for twelve teams, in three sections. These groups will build pipelines to analyze large datasets within a cloud infrastructure. The sections for this iteration are:"RNA-Seq Normalization for Every Biologist", "Translational Genomics", and "Democratization of Genomics". Please see the application for specific team projects.

    * Specific projects are available to other developers or mathematicians.

    Organization

    After a brief organizational session, teams will spend three days analyzing a challenging set of scientific problems related to a group of datasets. Participants will analyze and combine datasets in order to work on these problems. This course will take place on or near the NIH main campus in Bethesda, Maryland.

    Datasets

    Datasets will come from the public repositories housed at NCBI. During the course, participants will have an opportunity to include other datasets and tools for analysis. Please note, if you use your own data during the course, we ask that you submit it to a public database within six months of the end of the event.

    Products

    All pipelines and other scripts, software and programs generated in this course will be added to a public GitHub repository designed for that purpose. A manuscript outlining the design of the hackathon and describing participant processes, products and scientific outcomes will be submitted to an appropriate journal. A pre-print of the manuscript from the January NCBI/ADDS hackathon is available from bioRxiv.

    Application

    To apply, complete this form (approximately 10-15 minutes to complete). Applications are due June 6th by 3pm Eastern time. Participants will be selected from a pool of applicants; prior students and applicants will be given priority in the event of a tie. Please note: applicants are judged based on the motivation and experience outlined in the form itself. Accepted applicants will be notified on June 18th, by 2pm Eastern time, and have until June 22 at 5pm Eastern time to confirm their participation. Please include a monitored email address, in case there are follow-up questions.

    Note: Participants will need to bring their own laptop to this program. A working knowledge of scripting (e.g., Shell, Python) is necessary to be successful in this event. Employment of higher level scripting or programming languages may also be useful. Applicants must be willing to commit to all three days of the event. No financial support for travel, lodging or meals can be provided for this event. Also note that the course may extend into the evening hours on Monday and/or Tuesday. Please make any necessary arrangements to accommodate this possibility.

    Please contact ben.busby@nih.gov with any questions.

  • 23
    Jul

    Webinar: Everything You Need to Know about NCI’s Up for a Challenge

    July 23, 2015

    Signed up for NCI’s Up For a Challenge (U4C) or thinking about signing up? This webinar will help you get started by presenting an overview of the Challenge and explaining how to participate.

    Topics & Presenters:

    Overview of U4C - Elizabeth M. Gillanders, Ph.D., Genomic Epidemiology Branch, NCI

    How to Apply for U4C Data Using dbGaP – Leah E. Mechanic, Ph.D., M.P.H., Genomic Epidemiology Branch, NCI

    Downloading and Decrypting U4C Data From dbGap – Sara Lindstroem, Ph.D., Department of Epidemiology, Harvard H.T. Chan School of Public Health

     

    Questions may be submitted prior to the webinar via the U4C Community Forum or by e-mail (UpForAChallenge@mail.nih.gov).

    For those who are interested but unable to attend the live event, please know that we will record the webinar and make it available on the U4C website soon after the webinar.

    Accommodations: If you are a person with a disability and require an assistive device, services or other reasonable accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact us at NCIUpForAChallenge@mail.nih.gov at least one week in advance of July 23rd to discuss your accommodation needs.

  • 23
    Jul

    The Genomic Architecture of Chromosomal Regions that Direct Formation of the Largest Functional Domain in the Human Nucleus

    July 23, 2015

    Speaker: Sofia Nazaré de Pereira Barreira, School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Applied Mathematics, National University of Ireland, Galway

    Title: The Genomic Architecture of Chromosomal Regions that Direct Formation of the Largest Functional Domain in the Human Nucleus

    Date/Time: Thursday, July 23, 2015, 10:00 am

    Location: Fifth Floor Conference Room, Building 50, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    This is a special seminar hosted by the Computational and Statistical Genomics Branch, NHGRI Division of Intramural Research

  • 21
    Jul

    Venomics of Sea Anemones: A Bioinformatic Approach to Tissue-Specific Venom Composition and Toxin Gene Family Evolution

    July 21, 2015

    Speaker: Jason Macrander, Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University

    Title: Venomics of Sea Anemones:A Bioinformatic Approach to Tissue-Specific Venom Composition and Toxin Gene Family Evolution

    Date/Time: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 2:00 pm

    Location: Fifth Floor Conference Room, Building 50, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    This is a special seminar hosted by the Computational and Statistical Genomics Branch, NHGRI Division of Intramural Research

  • 20
    Jul

    Ideas lab: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Biomedical Data Science Challenges

    July 20, 2015

    The National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation are pleased to announce that applications are being invited for an Ideas Lab on “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Biomedical Data Science Challenges.”

    An Ideas Lab is a one-week residential workshop that brings together researchers in diverse disciplines to tackle a tough interdisciplinary problem. Applications are particularly being sought from any biomedical scientist with an analytical problem and data that may benefit from the contributions of quantitative scientists. 

    Dates: July 20-24, 2015

    Location: Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI) in Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Application Deadline: May 25, 2015

    For information and to apply, visit: http://www.samsi.info/ideas-lab

    This opportunity is also highlighted in a recent Input | Output blog post at https://datascience.nih.gov/blog/IdeasLab.

  • 20
    Jul

    NINR Big Data in Symptoms Research Methodologies Boot Camp Day 1 Videocast

    July 20, 2015

    The National Institute of Nursing Research’s (NINR) Big Data in Symptoms Research Methodologies Boot Camp will host a live videocast of the first day of the week-long training course on Monday, July 20, 2015 at 9 a.m. (EDT) at videocast.nih.gov. This videocast is free and open to the public. If you are unable to view the videocast live, it will be archived on the NINR website at a later date. 

    Date and Time: July 20, 2015 9:00 am - 5:15 pm

    Event Page: http://www.ninr.nih.gov/bootcamp

    Videocast: http://videocast.nih.gov

    Speakers:
    Dr. Patricia Grady, PhD, Director of the National Institute of Nursing Research
    Dr. Eric Green, MD, PhD, Director of the National Human Genome Research
    Dr. Bonnie Westra, PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI, University of Minnesota
    Dr. Patricia Brennan, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Dr. Connie Delaney, PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI, University of Minnesota
    Dr. Suzanne Bakken, DNSc, RN, FAAN, Columbia University

    Event Contact: Dr. Mary Engler (mary.engler@nih.gov) 301.594.0081

  • 16
    Jul

    Data Visualization Community of Practice Meeting

    July 16, 2015

    NIH and HHS staff are invited to attend the first Data Visualization Community of Practice (CoP) meeting, organized by the NIH Library Technology Sandbox Team. This free event will be held in the NIH Library Media Room, Building 10, and via webinar.

    Date and Time: Thursday July 16, 2015 1:00-2:00 pm

    Location: NIH Library, Clinical Center, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD

    Registration:
    To register to attend in-person, go to: http://nihlibrary.beta.libcal.com/event/2099445
    To register to attend via webinar, go to: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1309629766558442241.

    Event Contact: NIH Library Technology Sandbox Team (NIHLSandbox@nih.gov)

  • 13
    Jul

    Harnessing Big Data to Stop HIV

    July 13, 2015

    The Division of AIDS, NIMH Division of AIDS Research, NIH Big Data to Knowledge, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation are hosting a meeting, Harnessing Big Data to Stop HIV to further explore the potential for Big Data approaches to answer questions in HIV research. Over one and a half days, sessions will address examples of Big Data research, legal and ethical issues, and statistical and methodological challenges and solutions. Following a series of talks on these topics, there will be break-out sessions focused on five critical research areas: (1) HIV among women and girls, (2) HIV among men who have sex with men, (3) identification of those recently infected with HIV (4)  the HIV continuum of care, and (5) ethical, legal and policy challenges in big data research on HIV. In the breakout groups, participants will work together to define research questions that could be addressed with Big Data approaches, as well as new challenges that would arise in the use of Big Data techniques in each of these areas.

    Registration is required and webcasting will be available. This meeting is a companion to the new funding annoucement NIH PA-273, Harnessing Big Data to Stop HIV which is being solicited by NIAID, NCI, NIDA, and NIMH. 

    Location: 5601 Fishers Lane, Bethesda Maryland

    Registration: https://www.blsmeetings.net/HarnessingBigDataToStopHIV

    Agenda: https://datascience.nih.gov/sites/default/files/bd2k/docs/BD2stopHIV-agenda_FINAL.pdf 

    Videocast: 

    Day 1: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=16520&bhcp=1
    Day 2: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=16524&bhcp=1

    The organizing committee:

    Pim Brouwers, NIMH               Sam Garner, NIAID

    David Burns, NIAID                    Rosemary McKaig, NIAID

    Liza Dawson, NIAID                   Joana Roe, NIAID

    Elizabeth Flanagan, NIAID       Carolyn Williams, NIAID

  • 7
    Jul

    NIST Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop VIII

    July 7, 2015

    Location: NIST, Red and Green Auditoriums, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899

    Audience: Industry, Government, Academia

    Website: http://www.nist.gov/itl/cloud/cloud_computing_wkshp_viii.cfm

    Registration: There is NO registration fee. Registration will close on June 23, 2015. Please register at the Online Registration Site

    Purpose:

    To show federal leadership and support for the NIST technology role in U.S. Government agency adoption of cloud computing to reduce costs and improve services and to strengthen relationships with the private sector.

    NIST will host its eighth Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop on July 7-10, 2015. The format will be a 4-day event with the first day focusing on Cloud Standards (organized by ISO/IEC JTC1 SC38) followed by 3-days of Talks and Panels centered on specific areas of research and development in the cloud environment. The event will cover:

    • Current State of Cloud Computing Standards
    • Progress on the NIST SP500 293: 10 High Level Requirements for Cloud Adoption
    • Cloud Forensics
    • Cloud Computing: Customers and Government

    Additional information about conference topics is available here

    Please visit the event website here for additional information (including contacts), security instructions, and SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR NON U.S. CITIZENS. 

  • 4
    Jun

    Workshop on Reproducibility of Data Collection and Analysis—Modern Technologies in Genome Technology: Potentials and Pitfalls

    June 4, 2015

    Title: Workshop on Reproducibility of Data Collection and Analysis—Modern Technologies in Genome Technology: Potentials and Pitfalls

    June 4, 2015 12:30pm - 5:30 pm

    Location: Natcher Conference Center/Bldg 45 Room E1-E2

    This will be the third workshop sponsored by the NIH Office of the Director on the important topic of reproducibility, the subject of recent editorials in leading scientific journals.

    The workshop agenda and registration information can be found at: http://wals.od.nih.gov/reproducibility/   

    The purpose of these workshops is to educate the NIH intramural research community about what advanced technologies can accomplish and the kinds of reproducibility problems that can arise; provide a cautionary note to scientists who hope to use but are inexperienced with various new modeling techniques; and educate others who are attempting to interpret results in the literature.

    We have invited several world-class scientists who will speak about important technologies in genome technology. In addition, we have assembled a panel of editors from four scientific journals covering genome technology to discuss issues with data reproducibility in the scientific literature. I hope you will be able to attend either in person or via the videocast at http://videocast.nih.gov. We welcome our extramural colleagues to participate via the videocast, too. Please note that the videocast will be archived, too.    

    Sign language interpreters can be provided. Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Jacqueline Roberts, Jacqueline.Roberts@nih.gov, 301-594-6747, or the Federal Relay, 800-877-8339. 

  • 4
    Jun

    Elsevier @ NIH -- Fostering Research and Discovery

    June 4, 2015

    The NIH Library Hosts: Elsevier @ NIH -- Fostering Research and Discovery

    Dig more deeply into Elsevier content with us, and join us to learn more about how Elsevier data, text mining, and analytical tools are helping to answer researchers’ research and discovery needs.

    Thursday, June 4, 2015

    Location: NIH Library’s training room, 10 Center Drive, Building 10, Room 1L-25

    REGISTRATION REQUIRED: To register for in-person or remote participation, please contact:
    Manju Tanwar, MLIS MPH manju.tanwar@nih.gov

     

    AGENDA

    10:00 – 11:00     Roadmapping Brain Research with Elsevier         

    Presented Holly J Falk-Krzesinski, PhD, Vice President for Global Academic & Research Relations, Elsevier

    Through its data services, Elsevier helps its customers to identify research strengths, opportunities, and trends. Join us to learn more about how Elsevier used its data to conduct a ground-breaking, comprehensive report on the current state of global brain research, Brain Science: Mapping the Landscape of Brain and Neuroscience Research

    11:00—12:00     Data Analysis and Scopus

    Presented by Eric Livingston, Customer Consultant, Research Solutions, Elsevier

    Scopus provides access to the world’s largest online repository of abstracted and indexed peer-reviewed content, and helps NIH researchers to find, use, and apply knowledge. Join us to discuss how its data can be mined to better identify centers of excellence, experts, and trends.

    12:00 – 1:00     Lunch

    1:00 – 2:00         Putting Data to Work: Mining Elsevier Data to Help the Scientific Community Deliver Breakthroughs in Medicine

    Presented by Tim Hoctor, Vice President for Life Science Solutions Services, Elsevier

    From Scopus and SciVal to Reaxys and Knovel, Elsevier’s suite of services are driven by data and an array of tools, such as analytics and APIs, that help researchers to put that data to work. Tim Hoctor, Elsevier’s VP for Life Science Solutions Services, discusses how Elsevier data and increased collaboration between research scientists and technologists can help researchers to deliver breakthroughs in medicine.   

    2:00 – 3:00         Deep Data Mining on ScienceDirect

    Presented by Chris Shillum, Vice President, Platform and Data Integration

    ScienceDirect, Elsevier’s peer-reviewed, fulltext database, provides access to over 30,000 electronic book titles and more than 2,500 electronic journal titles covering the fields of science, technology, and medicine. But increasingly ScienceDirect provides access to “new articles,” including podcasts, vodcasts, and data, which can also provide more research insights, and more content to mine.

     

    Throughout the day, between 10:00-3:00, Elsevier search solutions  experts will be on hand in the NIH Library to provide one-on-one consultations on Elsevier products, including Scopus, ScienceDirect, Embase, and Reaxys. Whether you are a novice or proficient searcher with “How do I…?  or content-specific questions, we hope to see you there!

    On-line Access: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4548311633238487553

     

  • 3
    Jun

    Data-Driven Precision Medicine

    June 3, 2015

    National Library of Medicine Informatics Lecture Series

    Title: Data-Driven Precision Medicine

    Speaker: Atul Butte, MD, PhD

    Date: Wednesday, June 3, 2015

    Time: 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

    Location: Lister Hill Center Auditorium

    Abstract: There is an urgent need to translate genome-era discoveries into clinical utility, but the difficulties in making bench-to-bedside translations have been well described. The nascent field of translational bioinformatics may help. Dr. Butte's lab builds and applies computational tools to convert hundreds of trillions of points of molecular, clinical, and epidemiological data collected by researchers and clinicians worldwide over the past decade, now commonly known as “big data”, into new diagnostics, therapeutics, and insights into rare and common diseases. Dr. Butte, a bioinformatician and pediatric endocrinologist, will highlight how publicly-available molecular measurements to find new uses for drugs including drug repositioning for inflammatory bowel disease, discovering new treatable inflammatory mechanisms of disease in type 2 diabetes, and how the next generation of biotech companies might even start in your garage.

    Brief Bio: Atul Butte, MD, PhD is the founding Director of the newly-established Institute of Computational Health Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, and a Professor of Pediatrics.  Prior to his new position, he was the chief of the Division of Systems Medicine and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, where he has been a faculty member for the past decade. Trained in both Computer Science and Medicine at Brown University, Dr. Butte previously worked as a software engineer at Apple Inc. and Microsoft Corp., and received his PhD in Health Sciences and Technology from Harvard Medical School and MIT.  He has authored nearly 200 publications, with research repeatedly featured in the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal and Wired Magazine.  In 2013, Dr. Butte was recognized by the White House as an Open Science Champion of Change for promoting science through publicly available data. Dr. Butte is also a founder of several Bay Area biotech startup companies. He is also a member of the National Library of Medicine Biomedical Library and Informatics Review Committee.

     

    This talk will be broadcast live and archived at http://videocast.nih.gov/. Please note that the live videocast is available to NIH only, however the archived version will be world accessible.

     

    Sign Language Interpreters will be provided. Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodation to participate in this lecture should contact Ebony Hughes 301-451-8038 Ebony.Hughes@nih.gov or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339).

    Sponsored by:

    Extramural Programs Division, National Library of Medicine

    Dr. Valerie Florance, Associate Director for Extramural Programs

  • 3
    Jun

    NIH Data Center Tours - Center for Information Technology

    June 3, 2015

    The Center for Information Technology is now offering scheduled tours of the newly redesigned NIH Data Center located in Building 12 the first Wednesday of every month at 9 am. (Additional tours can be coordinated at other times as needed.)

    The NIH Data Center hosts a number of critical NIH and HHS enterprise applications and IC applications and databases on Windows Unix and Mainframe platforms general purpose and high performance scientific computing systems and email and Active Directory services for NIH. In addition the Data Center provides co-location services that house servers owned and managed by NIH Institutes. If you have not been to the Data Center recently there has been a host of changes over the last three years that have upgraded and modernized the facility.

    Website: http://training.cit.nih.gov

    Organization: NIH Center for Information Technology (CIT)

    Contact: CIT Training, (301) 594-6248

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, BuildingNIH Data Center Tours - Center for Information Technology12A, room 1100, Bethesda, MD 20892

  • 2
    Jun

    Science of Team Science (SciTS) 2015 Conference

    June 2, 2015

    The Science of Team Science (SciTS) 2015 Conference will be held June 2-5, 2015 at the National Institutes of Health main campus in Bethesda, Maryland.

    The Science of Team Science (SciTS) is a rapidly growing cross-disciplinary field of study that aims tobuild an evidence-base and to develop translational applications to help maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of team based research.

    The 2006 National Institutes of Health SciTS Conference helped to launch the SciTS field. Nearly 10 years later, the 2015 SciTS 2015 Conference will review the current state of knowledge in the SciTS field, highlight applications for enhancing team science, and discuss future directions for advancing SciTS to improve the global scientific enterprise.

    The SciTS 2015 Conference will bring together thought leaders in the SciTS field, scientists engaged in team-based research, institutional leaders who promote collaborative research, policy makers, and federal agency representatives. With this year’s location in the Washington DC metro area, a range of federal agencies will be participating, creating a unique focus on effective practices and policies, translational applications of SciTS scholarship, and approaches to evaluation.

    This year’s conference will also highlight the interface of the SciTS field with current hot topics and emerging trends, including diversity in science teams, big data, citizen science, open data, and research networking. The conference program will include invited speakers and plenary sessions in addition to submitted panels, papers and posters.

    Website: http://www.scienceofteamscience.org/

    Speakers: Phillip Allen Sharp, Professor of Biology, MIT; Nancy Cook, Professor of Applied Psychology, Arizona State University ; Christopher Austin, Director, NCATS, NIH; James Jackson, Director, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan Ann Arbor; Patricia Hurn, Vice Chancellor for Research and Innovation, University of Texas System; Howard Gadlin, Director, Center for Cooperative Resolution, NIH; L. Michelle Bennett, Deputy Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research (DIR), NHLBI, NIH; Griffin Weber, Head of the Knowledge Discovery & Management Group, Harvard Medical School; Robert Croyle, Director, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, NCI, NIH; Dan Stokols, Head of the Knowledge Discovery & Management , University of California - Irvine; Aparna Joshi, Associate Professor of Management & Organization , Penn State University Smeal College of Business; Scott E Page, Professor of Complex Systems, University of Michigan; Hannah Valantine, Chief Officer for Scientific Workforce Diversity, NIH; Jean Slutsky, Chief Engagement and Dissemination Officer, PCORI; Richard Nakamura, Director, Center for Scientific Review, NIH.

    Organization: National Cancer Institute

    Contacts: Kara L. Hall, (240) 276-6831, Amanda L. Vogel, (240) 276-6692, Brooke A. Stipelman, (240) 276-6726, Grace Huang, (240) 276-6816

  • 28
    May

    Cells to Civilizations: The Principles of Change that Shape Life

    May 28, 2015

    Author, Enrico Coen; addresses historical, classical, modern synthesis, and recent variants among concepts and postulated mechanisms of evolution, with attention to medical insights. Volunteers will give brief summaries of sections of the book and if there is time all who are interested will sit in a circle and engage in dialogue about the book. We will end no later than 7:30 p.m. because that’s the time we must give up the room. Then those who are interested will go to dinner in Bethesda.

    Series Name: NIH Biomedical Computing Interest Group Book Club Program

    Speaker: Jim DeLeo, Computer Scientist, NIH Clinical Center

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50, Room 1227/1233

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 20
    May

    The GTEx Symposium: All Things Considered – Biospecimens, ‘Omics Data, and Ethical Issues

    May 20, 2015

    The GTEx Symposium: All things considered – biospecimens, ‘omics data, and ethical issues will be held May 20-21, 2015 at NIH, co-hosted by NCI, NHGRI, NIMH, and the NIH Common Fund. The symposium will highlight the scientific goals of the GTEx program and progress in collecting and analyzing biospecimens from over 25 organ sites from 900 post-mortem donors. This two-day event is designed to inform the research community of the resources and infrastructure that are available for their use.

    Speaker: Eric Green, MD, Ph.D., National Human Genome Research Institute

    Organizations: NIH National Cancer Institute (NCI), NIH National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), NIH National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), NIH Common Fund

    Website: https://meetings.nigms.nih.gov/Home/Index/19217

    Contact: Benjamin Fombonne, (240) 276-5710

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 45 (Natcher Building), 45 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892

  • 14
    May

    The Search for Causes in a Complex World: The Why of Things

    May 14, 2015

    NIH Biomedical Computing (BCIG) Lecture

    Speaker: Peter Rabbins, Professor, John Hopkins School of Medicine

    Building: Building 50 Room 1227/1233

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 13
    May

    Statistical Analysis of Microarray Data

    May 13, 2015

    This course will provide an overview of statistical issues that arise in the design and analysis of microarray studies. The course will begin with a discussion practice of the various sources of variability inherent in microarray experiments, methods of evaluating data quality, and data normalization techniques. Focus will then shift to outlining the main types of scientific questions that investigators aim to answer from microarray experiments, accompanied by an in depth discussion of proper design and analysis strategies for addressing each of the specific types of questions. Integrated in the discussion will be "hands-on" demonstration of BRB Array Tools. Students are welcome to bring their own data for in-class exercises.

    CIT Training requests that you do not bring USB devices as they pose a security risk.

    Website: http://training.cit.nih.gov

    Organization: NIH Center for Information Technology (CIT)

    Contact: CIT Training, (301) 594-6248

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 12A, room B51, Bethesda, MD 20892

  • 11
    May

    Genomic data from multiple data sets: Methods, pros, and cons

    May 11, 2015

    OBSSR Webinar Series: Advances in GxE Research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences

    TITLE: Genomic data from multiple data sets: Methods, pros, and cons

    PRESENTER: E. Jane Costello Ph.D., Duke University

    DATE: Monday, May 11, 2015 – 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT

    ORGANIZER: NIH Office of Behavioral Health and Social Sciences (OBSSR) REGISTER FOR DIAL-IN INSTRUCTIONS:

    Registration site: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07eayrjo0scf6ce9e5&llr=vykrlptab  

    OVERVIEW

    In understanding the cause of many diseases, the search for genes has moved from the identification of rare high-risk variants to that of common low-risk variants.  The size of samples required for adequate power has correspondingly increased.  In the study of gene by environment interaction (G-E) models of disease risk, pooling data from different completed or ongoing studies is viewed as a time- and cost-effective alternative to the conduct of large new investigations designed to collect detailed phenotypic and “envirotypic” information.  Unfortunately, attempts to pull together cases from existing data sets have faced significant challenges to date, in part because studies lack consistent rules and methods for making diagnoses and for defining environmental risk.

     

    Our project sought to develop and test a new methodology for pooling data from studies that used different measures to assess the same or similar constructs.  In the present investigation, data was pooled from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), Great Smoky Mountains Study (GSMS), and Child Development Project (CDP) data sets.  The proposed data harmonization methodology involved the creation of a calibration data set, in which two or more measures of the same or similar constructs, obtained from the same participants, are compared and the scores on each measure mapped onto the other.  Calibration samples may be internal to the primary samples of scientific interest (if both measures were used in an existing data set), or may be external (obtained de novo); our work involved both types of samples.  We hope our investigation will provide an important tool for research across many areas of genomic research.

    PRESENTER'S BIO

    E. Jane Costello Ph.D.

    Jane Costello was educated at Oxford University (MA) and the London School of Economics and Political Science (Ph.D.). She did a postdoc in psychiatric epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh with Evelyn Bromet. Currently she is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke, where she co-directs the Center for Developmental Epidemiology. She is also an adjunct Professor in Duke’s Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, and Associate Director for Research at Duke’s Center for Child and Family Policy.

    From 2007 to 2014, Jane was Principal Investigator of the NIDA-funded, multi-site Gene, Environment, and Development Initiative, which brought together several longitudinal data sets to carry out co-operative GWAS and data analysis. She is currently part of the NIMH-funded “Developmental methylomics of childhood trauma and its health consequences”.

    Jane is currently directing the seventeenth annual wave of data collection for the Great Smoky Mountains Study, a longitudinal study of the development of psychiatric and substance abuse disorders and access to mental health care, in a representative sample of 1400 children and adolescents living in the southeastern United States.

     

    Individuals with disabilities who need Sign Language Interpreters and/or reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Erica Spotts at spottse@od.nih.gov or 3014021146, and/or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339).

     

  • 6
    May

    NIH Data Center Tours - Center for Information Technology

    May 6, 2015

    The Center for Information Technology is now offering scheduled tours of the newly redesigned NIH Data Center located in Building 12 the first Wednesday of every month at 9 am. (Additional tours can be coordinated at other times as needed.)

    The NIH Data Center hosts a number of critical NIH and HHS enterprise applications and IC applications and databases on Windows Unix and Mainframe platforms general purpose and high performance scientific computing systems and email and Active Directory services for NIH. In addition the Data Center provides co-location services that house servers owned and managed by NIH Institutes. If you have not been to the Data Center recently there has been a host of changes over the last three years that have upgraded and modernized the facility.

    Website: http://training.cit.nih.gov

    Organization: NIH Center for Information Technology (CIT)

    Contact: CIT Training, (301) 594-6248

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 12A, room 1100, Bethesda, MD 20892

  • 29
    Apr

    Webinar for RFA-CA-15-006 (BD2K) Advancing Biomedical Science Using Crowdsourcing and Interactive Digital Media (UH2)

    April 29, 2015

    The NIH recently issued the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) RFA-CA-15-006 "Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Advancing Biomedical Science Using Crowdsourcing and Interactive Digital Media (UH2)." An applicant informational webinar will be held on April 29, 2015, from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time) to provide information about this FOA to assist prospective applicants. NIH staff will discuss the FOA's goals and objectives, the review process, and address questions. The webinar is open to all prospective applicants, but participation in the webinar is not a prerequisite to applying.

    To participate in the webinar use the information provided below

    Webinar Site: https://cbiit.webex.com/cbiit/j.php?MTID=m54c569e33162c051a255238fbbd31b01

    Interactive Media FOA Webinar Slides

    Meeting number:733 334 360

    Meeting Password: BigData1@

    Please direct all inquiries to:

    David J. Miller, Ph.D.
    National Cancer Institute (NCI)
    Telephone: 240-276-6210
    Email: BD2K_targeted@mail.nih.gov

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 29
    Apr

    Advanced Computational Drug Design

    April 29, 2015

    The series is designed for newcomers to computational biology, but researchers will benefit from the breadth of material. The course will discuss approaches for both structure-based & ligand-based approaches to drug design. Various methods such as small molecule docking, QSAR, & pharmacophore modeling will be presented, as well as an example of a real world investigation. Learners will gain a greater understanding of the possibilities & limitations of these computational techniques & consider rules of thumb for deciding which methods to use. Guidelines, strategies, & best practices will be emphasized. Software packages & tools related to drug design will be introduced. The course is lecture only & includes detailed handouts in full color.

    Researchers who are interested in learning more about finding novel compounds & gaining a general overview of the computational techniques that are used in the drug discovery process are welcome to attend.

    Event Speaker: Phillip Cruz, NIAID

    Event Location: Building 12A Room B51

    Event URL: http://training.cit.nih.gov

    Contact Info: 301-594-6248

  • 29
    Apr

    Automated Sample Selection from Enormous Data: How Computer Programming Cut Time, Errors, and Costs

    April 29, 2015

    As improvements in next-generation sequencing technology continue to drive down cost, researchers are incentivized to reanalyze subsets of large repositories of banked DNA samples. Once the sample subset has been determined, physically transferring and managing samples for downstream analysis is not a trivial matter, often taking months of technician labor. Here the speakers present Samasy, a web-based sample management system that allows researchers to manage DNA samples, create batch files for robotic sample transfer, and monitor progress. A case-in-point of selecting 16,000 DNA samples for a custom exome array from pool of 54,000 will also be discussed.

    Speakers:  John Witte, Professor and Head, Division of Genetic and Cancer Epidemiology, University of California, San Francisco and Clinton Cario, University of California, San Francisco

    Website: http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/events/TEAM/index.html#auto

    Contact: TEAMepi@mail.nih.gov

     

     

  • 28
    Apr

    NIH Library Training - Introduction to R for Non-programmers | Webinar

    April 28, 2015

    Event URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2442418110850485249

    Event Speakers: NIH Library Staff

    Event Location: Webinar Only

    Contact Info: 301-496-1080; nihlibrary@nih.gov

     

  • 27
    Apr

    Interpretation of NIPT Findings with SG-ADVISER CNV

    April 27, 2015

    WebEx: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/dgm

    Dial-in Information
    Toll free: 1-866-692-3158
    Participant Passcode: 948 157 8400
    Mute/ unmute: *6

    Bio: Ali Torkamani, PhD, Director of Genome Informatics at the Scripps Translational Science Institute. Dr. Torkamani's research covers a broad range of areas centered on the use of genomic technologies to identify the genetic etiology and underlying mechanisms of human disease in order to define precision therapies for diseased individuals. Major focus areas include human genome interpretation and genetic dissection of novel rare diseases, predictive genomic signatures of response to therapy - especially cancer therapy, and novel sequencing-based assays as biomarkers of disease.

    Abstract: Genome sequencing-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) has been largely focused on whole chromosome events, such as chromosome 13, 18, 21 and sex chromosome aneuploidies. Collectively, whole chromosomal aneuploidies account for approximately 30% of all live births with a chromosomal abnormality. Sub-chromosomal structural variations, such as copy number variation (CNVs), account for the remaining 70% of live births with chromosomal abnormalities, but are more difficult to detect and classify. Because these CNVs may occur de novo, the physical boundaries of CNVs causing similar diseases can vary greatly, moreover, because of the relative rarity of each individual event, the critical region of many known pathogenic CNVs is not well defined. In order to evolve NIPT to a more comprehensive test, an automated method for the classification of pathogenic events will be required for routine reporting to clinicians.  In this study, we evaluated an automated CNV interpretation solution, by comparing classifications for 91 CNVs to a consensus opinion of experts.  The approach evaluates variants for likely functional impact using in silico prediction algorithms in conjunction with known annotated variants from a broad range of curated databases. Test CNVs were comprised of both duplications and deletions, spanning a range of ~1-77 megabases. Initial expert review resulted in 59 of 91 CNVs classified as pathogenic or potentially pathogenic.  The remaining 32 were considered variants of unknown significance (VUS).   Comparison of expert opinion to automated classifications suggests high concordance, providing a scalable and automated solution to reporting clinically relevant CNVs. Post-hoc discrepancy analysis resulted in VUS resolution and highlighted the potential for increased diagnostic yield of NIPT via automated classification.

    Ali Torkamani, Ph.D.
    Director of Genome Informatics and Drug Discovery The Scripps Translational Science Institute Assistant Professor of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology The Scripps Research Institute
    3344 North Torrey Pines Court, Suite 300 La Jolla, CA 92037
    Phone: 858-554-5727

  • 26
    Apr

    The Why of Things: Causality in Science, Medicine and Life

    April 26, 2015

    Volunteers will give brief summaries of sections of the book and then all who are interested will sit in a circle and engage in dialogue about the book. We will end no later than 7:30 p.m. because that’s the time we must give up the room. Then those interested will go to dinner in Bethesda.

    Speaker: Jim DeLeo, Computer Scientist, NIH Clinical Center

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50, Room 1227/1233

    Contact: Jim DeLeo, 301-496-3848

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 25
    Apr

    National DNA Day

    April 25, 2015

    National DNA Day is a unique day when students, teachers and the public can learn more about genetics and genomics! The day commemorates the completion of the Human Genome Project in April 2003, and the discovery of DNA's double helix.

    Modern genetics and genomics rely heavily on contributions from bioinformatics, computer science, and engineering. Without these fields, the human genome could not have been sequenced. Most of the subsequent and continuing research on what each gene actually does would not exist either. NIH DNA day programs are spearheaded by the National Human Genome Research Institute.

    Event Link: http://www.genome.gov/10506367

  • 23
    Apr

    The Why of Things: Causality in Science, Medicine and Life by Peter Rabins, AU

    April 23, 2015

    Volunteers will give brief summaries of sections of the book and if there is time all who are interested will sit in a circle and engage in dialogue about the book. We will end no later than 7:30 p.m. because that’s the time we must give up the room. Then those who are interested will go to dinner at Bistro Le Zeez in Bethesda.

    Series Name: NIH Biomedical Computing Interest Group Book Club Program

    Speaker: Jim DeLeo, Computer Scientist, NIH Clinical Center

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50, Room 1227/1233

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 22
    Apr

    Introduction to Computational Drug Design

    April 22, 2015

    The series is designed for newcomers to computational biology, but researchers will benefit from the breadth of material. The course will discuss approaches for both structure-based & ligand-based approaches to drug design. Various methods such as small molecule docking, QSAR, & pharmacophore modeling will be presented, as well as an example of a real world investigation. Learners will gain a greater understanding of the possibilities & limitations of these computational techniques & consider rules of thumb for deciding which methods to use. Guidelines, strategies, & best practices will be emphasized. Software packages & tools related to drug design will be introduced. The course is lecture only & includes detailed handouts in full color.

    Researchers who are interested in learning more about finding novel compounds & gaining a general overview of the computational techniques that are used in the drug discovery process are welcome to attend.

    Event URL: http://training.cit.nih.gov

    Event Speaker: Phillip Cruz, NIAID

    Event Location: Building 12A Room B51

    Contact info: 301-594-6248

     

  • 21
    Apr

    Precision Medicine In Action: Applying Genomic Tools To Improve Patient Outcomes After Organ Transplantation - Anita B. Roberts Lecture Series

    April 21, 2015

    Dr. Hannah Valentine, Chief Officer for Workforce Diversity and a senior scientist in the intramural research program, will give the 2015 seminar in the Anita B. Roberts Lecture Series: Distinguished Women Scientists at NIH. The series is sponsored by the NIH Women Scientist Advisors Committee (WSA), NHLBI, and ORWH, and highlights outstanding research achievements of women scientists in the Intramural Research Program at the NIH.

    Series Name: Anita B. Roberts Lecture Series

    Event Speaker: Dr. Hannah Valentine

    Event Location: Building 10 (Clinical Center), Lipsett Amphitheater

    Videocast URL: http://videocast.nih.gov

    Contact Info: 301-496-8195; klenkee@mail.nih.gov

  • 16
    Apr

    NIH Library Training- Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) Training (Hands on)

    April 16, 2015

    Event URL: http://training.cit.nih.gov

    Event Speakers: IPA Instructors

    Event Location: Building 10 (Clinical Center) NIH Library Training Room

    Contact Info: 301-496-1080, nihlibrary@nih.gov

  • 16
    Apr

    Inaugural Symposium on U.S. NIH-Korea Collaborative Biomedical Research

    April 16, 2015

    This symposium is established to promote U.S.-Korea collaborations in conducting mutually beneficial biomedical and behavioral research. In 2015, this symposium will highlight research in:

    * Obesity/diabetes/metabolic syndromes;

    * Neuroscience/neurodegenerative diseases;

    * Big data science;

    * Stem cell biology;

    * Immunology/infectious diseases; and

    * Cancer drug discovery/cancer treatment.

     

    However, submission of poster abstracts on any fields of biomedical and behavioral sciences is encouraged. Poster abstracts (300-words limit) can be uploaded to http://nihksa.org/xe/KSA/board_gyiL10 or sent to songm@mail.nih.gov through April 10th. Selected meritorious posters will be awarded on April 17th.

     

    Please register online at http://nihksa.org/xe/KSA/board_gyiL10 or send your information (name, affiliation, and e-mail address) to songm@mail.nih.gov in advance of the meeting. Onsite registration will also be available at 8:00 a.m. on both days of the meeting.

    Event URL: http://wals.od.nih.gov/us-korea/

    Event Speakers: For a full list of speakers, please visit the event website. 

    Event Location: Building 10 (Clinical Center) Lipsett Amphitheater, FAES Classrooms & Terrace

    Contact Info: 240-276-6139; songm@mail.nih.gov

  • 15
    Apr

    NIH Library Training - Introduction to Clinical Geonomics

    April 15, 2015

    Event URL: http://training.cit.nih.gov

    Special Instructions: Reservations or registration required for this event.

    To arrange sign language interpretation for an event go to the Office of Research Services (ORS) Interpreting Service Requests web page.

    Event Speaker: Staff NIH Library

    Event Location: Building 10 (Clinical Center); NIH Library Training Room

    Contact Info: 301-496-1080; nihlibrary@nih.gov

  • 13
    Apr

    NCCIH Integrative Medicine Research Lecture: Social Networks for Molecular Analysis

    April 13, 2015

    The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) presents the Integrative Medicine Research Lecture Series. The series provides overviews of the current state of research and practice involving complementary health therapies, and explores perspectives on the emerging discipline of integrative medicine. Pieter Dorrestein, Ph.D., is a professor of pharmacology, chemistry and biochemistry in the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Dorrestein is also the director of the Collaborative Mass Spectrometry Innovation Center and co-director of the Institute for Metabolomics Medicine at UC San Diego. Dr. Dorrestein’s research focuses on the development of new mass spectrometry approaches to detect and characterize therapeutic leads and their biosynthesis. In this lecture, Dr. Dorrestein will explore strategies for organizing and visualizing the massive amount of molecular information collected from mass spectrometers. Dr. Dorrestein will also discuss a new social networking tool his lab has launched in order to annotate molecular information and how this tool, which has nearly a billion spectra uploaded and thousands of users from 65 countries, can help further our understanding of molecular complexities. For more information, go to https://nccih.nih.gov/news/events/IMlectures.

    Event URL: https://nccih.nih.gov/news/events/IMlectures

    Videocast URL: http://videocast.nih.gov

    Event Speaker: Pieter Dorrestein, Ph.D., Professor, University of California, San Diego

    Event Location: Building 10 (Clinical Center); Masur Auditorium at the NIH Clinical Cent

    Contact: Yasmin Kloth - yasmin.kloth@nih.gov 301-451-6579

    Special Instructions: To arrange a sign language interpretation for an event go to the Office of Research Services (ORS) Interpreting Service Requests web page.

  • 9
    Apr

    Deep Learning

    April 9, 2015

    Deep Learning is a hot and controversial computer science topic. We can watch John Kaufhol’s and Jeremy Howard’s talks on “Deep Learning” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0FEZYZqqV8 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xx310zM3tLs&feature=youtu.be. It might be a good idea to watch the talks before coming to the meeting, however this is not a requirement. Please feel free to do other research that might help in enlivening the dialogue.

    Speaker: Jim DeLeo, Computer scientist, NIH Clinical Center

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50, Room 1227/1233

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 8
    Apr

    Software Carpentry Train-the-trainers

    April 8, 2015

    Contact: Lisa Federer

  • 2
    Apr

    Artificial Nose Identification of Bacterial and Viral Infections in Hospitalized Patients

    April 2, 2015

    I will describe our bio-medical research carried out in Professor Zeiry group at the Department of Bio-Medical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University, Be’er Sheva. We are applying GC/MS and portable ‘artificial nose’ measured scent for early cancer detection, physiological responses to stress and the possible classification of viral or bacterial infection of hospital patients. The ANN algorithm is used for the analysis of the collected data, automatic clustering and identification of possible bio-markers.

    Speaker: Zvi Boger, President of Optimal Neural Informatics

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 26
    Mar

    Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markeets, Our Jobs, and the World

    March 26, 2015

    Volunteers will give brief summaries of sections of the book and then all who are interested will sit in a circle and engage in dialogue about the book. We will end no later than 7:30 p.m. because that’s the time we must give up the room. Then those interested will go to dinner in Bethesda.

    Speaker: Jim DeLeo, Computer Scientist, NIH Clinical Center

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50, Room 1227/1233

    Contact: Jim DeLeo, 301-496-3848

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 26
    Mar

    The Why of Things: Causality in Science, Medicine and Life - cancelled

    March 26, 2015

    CANCELLED - Volunteers will give brief summaries of sections of the book and if there is time all who are interested will sit in a circle and engage in dialogue about the book. We will end no later than 7:30 p.m. because that’s the time we must give up the room. Then those who are interested will go to dinner in Bethesda.

    Series Name: NIH Biomedical Computing Interest Group Book Club Program

    Speaker: Jim DeLeo, Computer Scientist, NIH Clinical Center

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50, Room 1227/1233

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 20
    Mar

    Accelerating Cross-Sectoral Collaboration on Data in Climate, Education and Health

    March 20, 2015

    Hosted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), The Office for Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), The Governance Lab (The GovLab/NYU)
     

    This workshop will bring together government agencies, companies, data scientists and academics. This diverse set of participants will harness various competencies and areas of expertise to address existing knowledge gaps in the nascent field of data sharing. The focus of the discussion will be on the following issues:

     

    • Existing mechanisms of cross sectoral data sharing
    • Factors currently driving cross-sectoral data sharing (including incentives to participate in data collaboratives; the value and impact of sharing institutions and society-at-large; and methods and techniques for mitigating risks in data sharing)
    • Legal dimensions of cross-sectoral data sharing (including an examination of existing legal conventions that govern data sharing)
    • Best practices in forming and furthering data collaboratives

     

    The goal of the workshop is to identify and begin to address existing knowledge gaps for each of these areas. In doing so, the workshop will seek to deepen the value proposition of cross-sectoral sharing; foster greater participation and coordination among corporations and public organizations; and more generally enable the use of data and data sharing towards the greater public good.

    This workshop is open to invited participants only.

  • 13
    Mar

    Pi Day at NIH

    March 13, 2015

    The National Institutes of Health will hold a Pi Day Celebration on the NIH main campus in Bethesda, MD and online on Pi Day Eve, March 13, 2015. The goal of the NIH Pi Day Celebration is to increase awareness across the biomedical science community of the role that the quantitative sciences play in biomedical science.

     

    Event URL: http://nihpiday.nihlibrary.com/

    Videocast: Event will be videocast LIVE on the Web at http://videocast.nih.gov

  • 26
    Feb

    Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data

    February 26, 2015

    Volunteers will give brief summaries of sections of the book and then all who are interested will sit in a circle and engage in dialogue about the book. We will end no later than 7:30 p.m. because that’s the time we must give up the room. Then those interested will go to dinner at Bistro Le Zeez in Bethesda.

    Speaker: Jim DeLeo, Computer Scientist, NIH Clinical Center

    Location: On the main NIH Campus, Building 50, Room 1227/1233

    Contact: Jim DeLeo, 301-496-3848

    Click here for more details on the NIH Calendar

  • 25
    Feb

    NIH BD2K Workshop on Community-Based Data and Metadata Standards

    February 25, 2015

    Chairs: Melissa Haendel, Ph.D. and Christopher Chute, M.D., Dr.P.H.
    NIH Lead Organizers: Cindy P. Lawler, Ph.D.
    Website: https://tools.niehs.nih.gov/conference/community-based_standards/index.cfm

    Executive Summary: https://datascience.nih.gov/sites/default/files/bd2k/docs/ExecSumm_CBDMSworkshopFEB2015.pdf

    BD2K is formulating approaches to encourage development and facilitate the use of data-related (including metadata) standards more broadly across the biomedical research community and is, therefore, interested in the issues involved in developing Community-Based Standards (CBS). The goals of this workshop are:

    • Effective approaches, processes, and activities that could advance the community-based standards landscape (e.g., creating a collaborative workspace or an advising structure toward standards development, extension, or adoption).
    • Gaps in community-based data standards of relevance to biomedical research, including real use-cases (e.g., emerging fields and technologies, or research domains with multiple existing data standards that could benefit from additional work, integration and/or reconciliation).
    • Lessons learned from existing CBS efforts, particularly examples with field-tested processes and infrastructure or known examples of failures by CBS efforts.
    • Common challenges in CBS development (e.g., methods for community engagement or building interoperability with other related standards).
    • Considerations for evaluating progress and milestones to assess data standards development and utility.
    • Effective approaches for addressing the need to sustain useful standards, and to update existing standards as a field develops.


    This workshop is open to invited participants only.

  • 7
    Jan

    Software Carpentry Workshop (Beginner UNIX, R)

    January 7, 2015

    Contact: Lisa Federer

     

     

    The NIH Office of the Associate Director for Data Science and the NIH Library, in conjunction with NCI, are pleased to offer a two-day Software Carpentry workshop as part of the NIH Data Science Workforce Development Center. Software Carpentry's mission is to help researchers become more productive by teaching them core computing skills needed on a small research team. Short tutorials alternate with practical exercises, and all instruction is done via live coding. This two-day, hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools for scientific computing, including: the basics of structured programming in Python or R; version control using Git; and automating tasks using the Unix shell. For a detailed syllabus, seehttp://software-carpentry.org/lessons.html

    This free course is being offered September 9 and 11th, 2015 (9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.) at the NIH library. Applications are being accepted through August 19th. Click here to apply. 

     

    Sign language interpreters and other reasonable accommodations can be provided. If you require such accommodations, please contact the NIH Library Information Desk at 301.496.1080 five business days in advance. For TDD users/callers, please call the above number through the Federal Relay Service at 1.800.877.8339.

  • 5
    Jan

    NCBI/ADDS Hackathon

    January 5, 2015

    Contact: Ben Busby

  • 11
    Dec

    BD2K EHR Data Methodologies for Clinical Research: Perspectives from the Field Think Tank

    December 11, 2014

    Co-Chairs: Michael Kahn, M.D., Ph.D. and David Madigan, Ph.D.
    NIH Lead Organizers: Elaine Collier, M.D. and Gina Wei, M.D., M.P.H.
     

    This think tank convened a small number of experts specifically to address methods for optimizing the robustness and use of data from the Electronic Health Records (EHR) for a variety of clinical research purposes that fall within NIH’s domain. Given the potential broad scope of this topic, participants were asked to focus primarily on issues related to the use of EHR on the ‘back end’ (i.e. the imperfect data as currently collected), rather than strategies to improve the quality of EHR data collected on the ‘front end’ (e.g., data entered by clinicians). Experts in accessing EHR data and experts in study design and analysis methods for research using EHR data presented the challenges, solutions, and needs based on their experience and knowledge of the field.

    Workshop Report: EHR Data Methods Workshop Report

    Videocast: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=15299&bhcp=1

    Agenda (with links to slides presentations): EHR Data Methods Workshop

    Contacts: Elaine Collier and Gina Wei

  • 8
    Dec

    NIH BD2K Think Tank: Game Developers and Biomedical Researchers

    December 8, 2014

    December 8-9, 2014 
    Co-Chairs: Ben Sawyer and Markus Covert, Ph.D.
    NIH Lead Organizers: David Miller, Ph.D. and Jennifer Couch, Ph.D.

    Report | Agenda | Participant List

    As a component of the BD2K program, the National Institutes of Health is hosting a diverse group of game developers and biomedical researchers in a think tank exploring research games and the application of game methods and technologies for biomedical research. The purpose of this think tank is to explore the opportunities in and begin to address challenges of how these two communities – Game Developers and Biomedical Researchers – currently collaborate, exchange data science & visualization expertise, and develop games for enabling and performing biomedical research that addresses important science and health issues that affect everyone. This day and a half meeting will focus discussions on the following themes: 1) the technical and social infrastructure that enables Game Developers and Scientific Researchers to first find each other and then create new games, tools, and interfaces to research, 2) the common elements across biomedical research problems and games that both communities can address, and 3) the marketplace for matching games-amenable problem holders to solution providers.

    Contact: brownrob@mail.nih.gov  

    Join Day 1 WebEx (Dial In #: 1-240-276-6338) 
    Meeting ID #: 732 503 587 
    Password: Dcb@12345 

    Join Day 2 WebEx (Dial In #: 1-240-276-6338) 
    Meeting ID #: 731 351 883 
    Password: Dcb@12345 

    Twitter: #BD2K #ResearchGames

  • 2
    Nov

    NIH BD2K Joint Kick-Off Meeting

    November 2, 2014

    Co-Chairs:Lisa Brooks & Ron Margolis

    Meeting Agenda

    The intention of this meeting is for the DDICC and BD2K Center investigators to discuss the goals of their consortia and how to collaborate with each other, other BD2K projects, and the NIH Commons.

    Contact: Julia.puzak@nih.gov

  • 3
    Sep

    ADDS Data Science Workshop

    September 3, 2014

    Introduction | BD2K Overview | Training Overview | NIH Commons Overview

    The goal of this workshop was to gather a group of external experts in biomedical data science, including some members of the original Data and Informatics Working Group, to discuss the future of data science at NIH. The information gathered at the meeting will be used to chart future efforts of the newly-formed ADDS office and the BD2K program.

    Contact: Leigh.Finnegan@nih.gov

    Agenda: ADDS Meeting Agenda

    Participant List: ADDS Meeting Attendees

    Videocast: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?Live=14643&bhcp=1

  • 12
    May

    BD2K Software Discovery Workshop

    May 12, 2014

    Co-Chairs: Dr. Owen White and Dr. Asif Dhar

    Workshop Report | Agenda | Participant List

    The Software Discovery workshop explored the challenges and opportunities associated with citing, tracking, and sharing biomedical software. We were interested in gaining an understanding of approaches for making software easier to locate via computer-readable meta-data, digital identifiers, and other methods. In addition, the workshop focused on identifying the needs of biomedical software users and developers as they seek to find, cite, and use these tools in biomedical research. Finally, we identified potential barriers and incentives to adoption and use of these different discovery, citation, tracking methods. The workshop was organized around three major sessions: Finding and Tracking Software; Software Citation and Other Incentives; and Software Reproducibility.

     

    Contact: BD2Kworkshops@mail.nih.gov

    Twitter Feed:#bd2kSDW

    Videocast Day 1: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=14073

    Videocast Day 2: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=14171

  • 13
    Jan

    Applicant Information Webinar for RFA-HG-14-001 BD2K-LINCS-Perturbation Data Coordination and Integration Center (DCIC) (U54)

    January 13, 2014

    Chairs: Dr. Jennie Larkin & Dr. Ajay Pillai

    An Applicant Information Webinar will be held on Monday, January 13, 2014, from 1:00 – 2:30 pm ET, to provide information about the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) FOA to prospective applicants. This FOA seeks applications to develop a data coordination and integration center (DCIC) that will address the opportunities and challenges provided by two major NIH efforts: Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) and the Library of Integrated Network-Based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). The NIH expects that this BD2K-LINCS DCIC will focus on perturbagen-response data and signatures while ensuring that the resulting resources are effectively utilized by the community by addressing challenges related to biomedical Big Data. A successful DCIC will ensure consistent annotation of data and tools generated within the LINCS program; incorporate (without replicating databases) relevant non-LINCS perturbation data into the LINCS resource; support integration of relevant data, signatures, and tools to allow for seamless exploration of the (LINCS) program’s output by a broad range of biomedical researchers; support linkages to outside knowledge bases, data portals, and resources; support training in perturbation-data science skills; build innovative access and query tools to disparate databases hosting multiple data types; and disseminate the resulting tools and resources to the broad range of biomedical researchers. Related FOAs of relevance to the DCIC include RFA-RM-13-013 soliciting applications for LINCS data and signature generation and RFA-HG-13-009 soliciting applications for BD2K Centers of Excellence.

    Funding Opportunities: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HG-14-001.html
     

    Information on how to participate in the webinar:
    Registration: None
    Audio: Dial: 1-800-779-8174
               Participant Code: 38-60-157
    URL: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/r6j0ieehwxb/
    Contactlincsproject@mail.nih.gov 
    Slides with background information that will be displayed during the webinar will be available at www.lincsproject.org  shortly before the webinar begins. A document with the questions and responses addressed during the webinar, and an audio recording of the webinar will also be made available on this website.

  • 25
    Sep

    Frameworks for Community-Based Standards Efforts

    September 25, 2013

    Co-Chairs: Susanna Sansone, PhD and David Kennedy PhD.

    Workshop Summary | Workshop Report

    The overall goal of this workshop is to learn what has worked and what has not worked in community-based standards efforts. Participants will have experience in leading specific community based standards initiatives.  Prior to the workshop, participants will be asked to address in writing answers to specific questions regarding formulating, conducting, and maintaining such efforts.  This information will be used to facilitate focused and actionable discussion at the workshop.  Issuance of a Request for Information soliciting comment from the broader community on some of the key issues addressed in the workshop is currently envisioned.

    Contact: BD2Kworkshops@mail.nih.gov
    Agenda: Frameworks for Community-Based Standards Efforts (PDF 40.7KB)
    Participant List: Roster of Invited Participants (PDF 32KB)
    Videocast:http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=13088
     

  • 12
    Sep

    Applicant Information Webinar for RFA HG-13-009 Centers of Excellence for Big Data Computing in the Biomedical Sciences (U54)

    September 12, 2013

    Chair: Dr. Carson Loomis

     

    This webinar will provide information about the FOA (RFA HG-13-009)to prospective applicants. NIH staff will provide an overview of the FOA and answer questions. The webinar is open to all prospective applicants. Participation in the teleconference is not a prerequisite for applying, and is not required for a successful application.

    Potential applicants are encouraged to submit their questions or comments toBD2KCenterRFA@mail.nih.gov prior to the meeting. Afterwards, the webinar slides and a summary of the questions and answers will be posted on the site.

     

     

    Click here for Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and answers; this information may be updated without additional notice.

    Contact: BD2KCenterRFA@mail.nih.gov
     

    Webinar Video:

    Video Transcript: Centers of Excellence for Big Data Computing in Biomedical Sciences (U54) Webinar (PDF 71KB)

     

  • 11
    Sep

    Enabling Research Use of Clinical Data

    September 11, 2013

    Co-Chairs: Robert M. Califf, M.D. and Daniel R. Masys, M.D.

    Agenda | Biographies | Workshop Report| Workshop Site

    This workshop will identify actionable steps that NIH can take (alone and with others) to enable research use of clinical data, e.g., in pragmatic clinical trials, observational studies, and genome-phenome relationships using electronic health records and other clinical data. In particular, we will consider needs for: 1) research and development of new technologies and methods; 2) common infrastructure to enable the future research scenarios; and 3) policy changes necessary to facilitate progress. Read More

    Contact: BD2Kworkshops@mail.nih.gov

     

    Videocast Day 1: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?Live=13122

    Videocast Day 2: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?Live=13124

  • 21
    Aug

    NIH Data Catalog

    August 21, 2013

    Chair: Francine Berman, Ph.D.

    Workshop Summary | Agenda | RFI Response Summary| Participant List

    This workshop seeks to identify the least duplicative and burdensome, and most sustainable and scalable method to create and maintain an NIH Data Catalog. An NIH Data Catalog would make biomedical data findable and citable, as PubMed does for scientific publications, and would link data to relevant grants, publications, software, or other relevant resources. The Data Catalog would be integrated with other BD2K initiatives as part of the broad NIH response to the challenges and opportunities of Big Data and seek to create an ongoing dialog with stakeholders and users from the biomedical community.

    Contact: BD2Kworkshops@mail.nih.gov

  • 29
    Jul

    Workshop on Enhancing Training for Biomedical Big Data

    July 29, 2013

    Co-chairs: Karen Bandeen-Roche, Ph.D and Zak Kohane, M.D., Ph.D.

    RFI (NOT-HG-13-003) | RFI Summary | Workshop Report

    This workshop provided recommendations that will guide NIH staff in the development of long- and short-term training initiatives, which aim to prepare and empower the biomedical research community to take full advantage of Big Data. The workshop will (a) identify the knowledge and skills needed by individuals and by collaborating teams to work productively with biomedical Big Data, and (b) discuss resources and programs needed to help both trainees and practicing scientists acquire the identified knowledge and skills.

    Contact: BD2Kworkshops@mail.nih.gov

    Agenda: Workshop on Enhancing Training for Biomedical Big Data Agenda (PDF 149KB)

    Videocast Day 1: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=12972

    Videocast Day 2: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=12974

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